TwitterFacebook

Calls for the GOP to Break Out of Its “Media Cocoon”

Not gonna happen
Politics • Views: 27,643

Politico has a piece today on some conservatives’ calls for the GOP to break out of its self-reinforcing echo chamber: The GOP’s Media Cocoon.

A long-simmering generational battle in the conservative movement is boiling over after last week’s shellacking, with younger operatives and ideologues going public with calls that Republicans break free from a political-media cocoon that has become intellectually suffocating and self-defeating.

GOP officials have chalked up their electoral thumping to everything from the country’s changing demographics to an ill-timed hurricane and failed voter turn-out system, but a cadre of Republicans under 50 believes the party’s problem is even more fundamental.

The party is suffering from Pauline Kaelism.

Kael was The New Yorker movie critic who famously said in the wake of Richard M. Nixon’s 49-state landslide in 1972 that she knew only one person who voted for Nixon.

Now, many young Republicans worry, they are the ones in the hermetically sealed bubble — except it’s not confined to geography but rather a self-selected media universe in which only their own views are reinforced and an alternate reality is reflected.

Hence the initial denial and subsequent shock on the right that the country would not only reelect President Barack Obama — but do so with 332 electoral votes.

“What Republicans did so successfully, starting with critiquing the media and then creating our own outlets, became a bubble onto itself,” said Ross Douthat, the 32-year-old New York Times columnist.

Nice sounding words, right? But I don’t believe for a second that the Republican Party is going to be able to reverse this downward spiral; the appeals to racism and xenophobia are far too ingrained in the very identity of the GOP. I predict that the trends will go in the exact opposite direction — even more extremist — and the party will continue purging moderates and pandering to the far right and the religious right, only more so.

I believe the only changes we’ll see will be changes for the worse. It would be wonderful if I’m proven wrong, but I won’t be.

Jump to bottom

188 comments

1 Obdicut  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 10:53:23am

The bubble is highly profitable for a lot of people. That's the main reason it exists. Wingnut farms are highly productive.

2 Sol Berdinowitz  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 10:55:06am

Fox and EIB are highly successful businesses. They tend to support the Republican agenda, but their true agenda is to maximize profits for shareholders.

3 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 10:56:18am

re: #1 Obdicut

The bubble is highly profitable for a lot of people. That's the main reason it exists. Wingnut farms are highly productive.

Yep - these "young conservatives" (most of whom actually aren't very young) are missing the point. There's money to be made by feeding hatred - lots of it. This is a far stronger force than any "young conservative's" pipe dreams.

4 Ben G. Hazi  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 10:56:48am

It's easier to give in to the dark than to fight for the light.

The GOP, as a party, has been mainlining hate, bigotry, and ignorance for too long; if they don't have some sort of intervention (meaning that remaining "moderates" need to grow some balls and work towards marginalizing and pushing out the RWNJs), the party will end up face-down in a gutter with a needle in its arm.

5 dragonfire1981  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 10:57:19am
A long-simmering generational battle in the conservative movement is boiling over after last week’s shellacking, with younger operatives and ideologues going public with calls that Republicans break free from a political-media cocoon that has become intellectually suffocating and self-defeating.

GOP officials have chalked up their electoral thumping to everything from the country’s changing demographics to an ill-timed hurricane and failed voter turn-out system, but a cadre of Republicans under 50 believes the party’s problem is even more fundamental.

At first I read that as "self-defecating". No lie.

6 Sol Berdinowitz  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 10:57:27am

This is a party that believes that politics should be dominated by businessmen, so their point of view is always going to prevail.

7 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 10:58:38am

But at its core, it's not money that's the motivating factor for most of these people - it's atavism and bigotry. That's why Fox and Limbaugh and the rest of the right wing noise machine are able to squeeze so much money out of the rubes - because they're true believers in that reactionary hatred.

8 darthstar  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 10:59:11am

Conservative media doesn't appeal to racism and xenophobia, they encourage it. If they didn't give voice to people like Bryan Fischer, Rush Limbaugh, and Bill O'Reilly, fewer people would think it's okay to be a bigot. They're actually cultivating bigotry...and they're doing it for profit.

9 dragonfire1981  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:00:33am

re: #3 Charles Johnson

Yep - these "young conservatives" (most of whom actually aren't very young) are missing the point. There's money to be made by feeding hatred - lots of it. This is a far stronger force than any "young conservative's" pipe dreams.

The thing is though a lot of the right wing media outlets continually reinforce the idea that we have to get the right people elected to bring about real change and when that doesn't happen...then what?

I mean to me it's something a boy who cried wolf scenario. How many election thrashings will it take before conservatives realize the ideas espoused by the media outlets are just not getting them into the White House??

To me I think we're seeing the beginning of a slow burn as a younger generation of Republicans pushes aside the old Guard. I think come the 2020 elections the GOP will look VERY different.

10 Randall Gross  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:04:38am
But I don’t believe for a second that the Republican Party is going to be able to reverse this downward spiral; the appeals to racism and xenophobia are far too ingrained in the very identity of the GOP. I predict that the trends will go in the exact opposite direction — even more extremist — and the party will continue purging moderates and pandering to the far right and the religious right, only more so.

The forces aligned against them are immense, there's the RW mediaverse, the breitbrat/hot air troll hordes who get released like hounds anytime someone goes out of bounds, and the fact that almost 100 percent of their big donors are so fundamentalist.

11 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:06:32am

Even though Fox News definitely exploits the right for profit, I think it's a mistake to say they're just interested in making money. I've met several top Fox executives, and they really do believe in the right wing line - it's not an act.

12 Killgore Trout  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:06:35am

re: #9 dragonfire1981

To me I think we're seeing the beginning of a slow burn as a younger generation of Republicans pushes aside the old Guard. I think come the 2020 elections the GOP will look VERY different.

I think so too. It's going to be slow but change is inevitable. I have no idea what the gop will look like in 2020 but it should be interesting.

13 Randall Gross  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:07:14am

The right wing is a very tribal tribe. Xenophobes are us, and anyone not toeing the line must be from Barrytown.

14 Sol Berdinowitz  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:08:06am

I saw the when Karl Rove got trounced for daring to even indirectly criticize Tea Party darling Christine O'Donnel - despite the fact that she lost big-time anyways and was a major embarassment to herself and the party.

That was when I knew that the GOP establishment was not able to stand up to the crazies.

15 DelusionDeluge  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:08:17am

It's easy for any non-hack to identify the rise of Limbaugh and the Lewinsky hearings in the 90s as the beginning of our national divide and end of the Republican party of Reagan. It is amazing that Barack Obama, president precisely because of this strategy and it's flowering in late-90s/early 2000s, is blamed for our nation's divisions. The lack of self-reflection is alarming and sociopathic. Particularly when you consider the concessions Obama has made to conservatives these last four years. When all the House has to do to meet him is let the Bush tax cuts expire, raising the rate 3% on any income over $250,000, and they won't do it out of spite, that's a party that deserves to lose by landslides for infinity.

16 Charleston Chew  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:08:25am
Grayson continued: “It’s very striking for me living in Cambridge now. My Facebook feed, which is full of mostly conservatives from Kentucky, contains very different links to articles or topics than what I see in Cambridge. It is sort of the reverse up here. They don’t understand how anyone would eat Chick-fil-A, watch college sports or hold pro-life views.”

He's right about 2 out of 3, but sports are big there like everywhere else. Maybe not Harvard sports (unless you count rowing and beer pong).

17 Randall Gross  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:08:40am

re: #12 Killgore Trout

It could accelerate as their paleo wing dies off.

18 Shiplord Kirel  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:08:59am

I've said many times that the right wing is a marketing framework rather than a political instrument. They won't care about defeat as long as they can use the ideology to peddle radio ads, DVDs, home-schooling supplies, health supplements and the rest of the shoddy merchandise that is their real stock in trade.
The ideology is real enough, and sincerely accepted in some quarters, but it would be a severely marginalized footnote without the profit potential that comes from magnifying and rationalizing ordinary prejudices.

19 Randall Gross  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:09:28am

That's a 1974 live from Irvine version of Barrytown up there btw, you should give it a listen.

20 Mich-again  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:09:56am

Its not going to get better for them, its going to get worse. The ones who left the GOP ranch and voted for Obama in 2012 (like my wife and I) are the worst sort of foe for the GOP, the apostates.

The ones who were lifelong supporters but abandoned ship in the wake of Tea Party racism, anti-science kookery and religious fanaticism are not coming back and instead we are bringing more of the tepid GOP supporters over to this side simply by explaining to friends and family why we left.

It's going to keep getting harder for the GOP to hold onto College degreed, politically moderate, working families.

If they really do double down on the extremism, their support won't just fade away, it will fall off the table.

21 Charleston Chew  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:14:06am

re: #11 Charles Johnson

Even though Fox News definitely exploits the right for profit, I think it's a mistake to say they're just interested in making money. I've met several top Fox executives, and they really do believe in the right wing line - it's not an act.

It seemed clear that anyone with foresight would hedge on who wins a close election, instead of making wildly inaccurate predictions that would be indisputably disproved on Nov 6.

Reminds me of "end of the world" cults. The insane ones pick a specific date and when that day comes they look foolish. The sane ones (con artists) never get that specific.

22 Shiplord Kirel  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:15:12am

re: #18 Shiplord Kirel

I've said many times that the right wing is a marketing framework rather than a political instrument. They won't care about defeat as long as they can use the ideology to peddle radio ads, DVDs, home-schooling supplies, health supplements and the rest of the shoddy merchandise that is their real stock in trade.
The ideology is real enough, and sincerely accepted in some quarters, but it would be a severely marginalized footnote without the profit potential that comes from magnifying and rationalizing ordinary prejudices.

To clarify by example, this is what is happening with creationism. A nagging prejudice in the minds of the ignorant is magnified and given some media trained spokesmen, a website, and shiny new books, and suddenly it is legitimate and respectable. The shame and self reproach of ignorance and bigotry are removed, and the ignorant bigot can deny his debased nature and hold his head high with none of the hard work of actually learning anything.

23 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:16:02am

I've been saying for ages that the only thing which will pop the GOP's alternate reality bubble is a Mondale-style humiliation at the polls. I still believe that.

In the short term, they're going to double and triple down on the fail and the derp, convinced that they have a messaging problem, and that all it will take is a TRUE CONSERVATIVE™ nominee and a Latino version of El Rushbo to win. They won't learn anything until they nominate a pure ideologue and get their ass handed to them.

24 jaunte  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:16:58am

re: #21 Charleston Chew

The insane ones pick a specific date and when that day comes they look foolish.

This doesn't seem to be a problem for political pundits. Dick Morris has already moved on into demanding "a full investigation into the Benghazi attack" and shouting about the "Iranian coverup."

25 erik_t  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:17:38am

re: #23 Lidane

I've been saying for ages that the only thing which will pop the GOP's alternate reality bubble is a Mondale-style humiliation at the polls. I still believe that.

Will they see it? Will they care? Who is 'they' at this point, anyway?

Absent the smoke-filled-back-room system of the era, I don't see how a political party unmarginalizes.

26 Charleston Chew  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:17:58am

re: #20 Mich-again

It's going to keep getting harder for the GOP to hold onto College degreed, politically moderate, working families.

This is why they make their own colleges like Liberty University.

27 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:18:24am

I JUST THREW UP IN MY MOUTH

28 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:19:12am

I see no desire or real inclination to adapt to the realities of 2012 America by many in the GOP. They think they can just run the 1980 template model combined with some Tea Party nonsense and think that's going to work with the American people. Conservative pundits point out that most Americans think government intervention in our personal lives is too big but they ignore that people are talking about socially conservative policies there too. Ones that the GOP supports strongly. Their big problem of problems is they're not making any real inroads with growing groups like Latinos, young people, etc. Some of them think you can just hold Marco Rubio or Bobby Jindal out there to minority voters and it would be "See, we're not all bigots." But it never works that way. There was a similar hope with Palin that women voters would see Palin and totally forget and ignore the GOP's hostility to many issues that are important to American women. If they want to succeed, they need to adapt and realize that the old way is over.

29 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:19:47am

re: #26 Charleston Chew

This is why they make their own colleges like Liberty University.

or law schools like Regent.

30 lostlakehiker  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:20:07am

The NYT article was about what would have to happen for the Republicans to again stand a chance. Not about whether it would, in fact, happen.

Charles is probably right that it won't. Not because the bulk of those who voted for Romney are racist bigots, full of hate and drinking the Kool-Aid. But because the primaries have a dynamic of their own. A sensible, centrist Republican who might be a contender in the general election is a target throughout the primaries. He or she stands a good chance of being knocked out by triumphant zealots (who will go down in flames in the general election.) And if they fight fire with fire to win the nomination, and throw red meat to the narrow "conservative base", the price of winning the primary is to be quoted in the general election.

Rick Perry was too hopped up on percodan to be a coherent contender in the primaries, but he was right on in-state tuition for illegal aliens who grew up attending our schools. How crazy do things have to get before a Texas conservative is drummed out of the race as being too far left for the GOP? Right---pretty crazy.

There probably isn't any cure for this. The dynamics of the primaries will be that moderates either defect to the Democrats or sit out the primaries. Loons compete with shape-shifters. Either way, the general election is hopeless.

Two party politics will reemerge when today's Democrat party fractures. Perhaps over the inherent tension between the interests of state employees and the need to face up to fiscal reality. Perhaps over whether to allow wind turbines, or nuclear power, or solar power...all of these carry some local cost to the environment, even as they are our only hopes for the general good of the planet. Perhaps over some other issue where the general public good is in tension with the desires of the party's core supporters.

31 RadicalModerate  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:20:11am

This is something that I've mentioned before. The roots of this new social extremism goes way back into the 1980s/1990s with groups like Pat Robertson's "Christian Coalition", who were quietly injecting their own politicians into local Republican organizations, as well as the Young Conservatives, College Republicans and their backers The Leadership Institute (who have some rather well-documented dubious ties to white nationalism).

For those of you who don't recognize that last group, here's an example of one of their banner ads that showed up on LGF this last election cycle.

Image: LeadershipInstitute_Adsense_Capture.JPG

32 OhNoZombies!  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:20:11am

1964 and 1965 led directly to the Southern Strategy.
Ronald Reagan praised states rights and opened the door to evangelicals.
Jesse Helms warned his constituents of the "Black Hands" coming to take "stuff" away from hard working Americans. Etc., etc., etc.

This stuff has been a long time in the making, and many of us were keenly aware of the GOP pattern of behavior long before Fox and Rush.

The difference now, is the animus which has been festering just below the surface, has been given a voice by RW media and the internet, so everyone can see it.

The ugly isn't going away anytime soon, I think.

33 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:21:15am

re: #25 erik_t

Will they see it? Will they care? Who is 'they' at this point, anyway?

Absent the smoke-filled-back-room system of the era, I don't see how a political party unmarginalizes.

I just look at the Dems from the 80's. No one thought they'd bounce back from Carter, Mondale, and Dukakis losing, but behind the scenes, especially after Mondale, there were centrist and pragmatist Dems who started laying the groundwork to kick the moonbats and hippies to the damn curb and bring the party back to the land of reason.

The GOP needs its own version of the DLC, but that won't happen until there's a nominee like Santorum or Palin that's a true wingnut believer who gets killed at the polls.

34 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:22:10am

re: #32 OhNoZombies!

1964 and 1965 led directly to the Southern Strategy.
Ronald Reagan praised states rights and opened the door to evangelicals.
Jesse Helms warned his constituents of the "Black Hands" coming to take "stuff" away from hard working Americans. Etc., etc., etc.

This stuff has been a long time in the making, and many of us were keenly aware of the GOP pattern of behavior long before Fox and Rush.

The difference now, is the animus which has been festering just below the surface, has been given a voice by RW media and the internet, so everyone can see it.

The ugly isn't going away anytime soon, I think.

I still have no respect for Reagan at all for opening his 1980 presidential campaign where Goodman, Chaney, and Schwerner were kidnapped and later killed and talking about "states rights." And I still contend that as bad as Watergate was that the Southern Strategy is the greater blemish on Nixon's record in public life.

35 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:24:10am

re: #33 Lidane

I just look at the Dems from the 80's. No one thought they'd bounce back from Carter, Mondale, and Dukakis losing, but behind the scenes, especially after Mondale, there were centrist and pragmatist Dems who started laying the groundwork to kick the moonbats and hippies to the damn curb and bring the party back to the land of reason.

The GOP needs its own version of the DLC, but that won't happen until there's a nominee like Santorum or Palin that's a true wingnut believer who gets killed at the polls.

I think the problem is there is no equivalent of the DLC right now. Even in the 80's there was a movement like that within the Democratic Party. There were elected officials like Bill Clinton, Chuck Robb, and others who saw that the old way wasn't working and were demonstrating via governing a new way of doing so.

36 Skip Intro  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:25:09am

re: #27 Vicious Babushka

I JUST THREW UP IN MY MOUTH

[Embedded content]

This is pretty bad, plus I recently learned he does ads for Macys, which is now dead to me.

Why does a "high class billionaire" have to do advertising for middle-brow Macys anyway?

37 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:25:51am

re: #36 Skip Intro

This is pretty bad, plus I recently learned he does ads for Macys, which is now dead to me.

Why does a "high class billionaire" have to do advertising for middle-brow Macys anyway?

Ewwww. I have a Macy's card. Guess I will be shopping at Nordstrom from now on.

38 Randall Gross  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:26:01am

re: #32 OhNoZombies!

1964 and 1965 led directly to the Southern Strategy.
Ronald Reagan praised states rights and opened the door to evangelicals.
Jesse Helms warned his constituents of the "Black Hands" coming to take "stuff" away from hard working Americans. Etc., etc., etc.

This stuff has been a long time in the making, and many of us were keenly aware of the GOP pattern of behavior long before Fox and Rush.

The difference now, is the animus which has been festering just below the surface, has been given a voice by RW media and the internet, so everyone can see it.

The ugly isn't going away anytime soon, I think.

I've not seen it so up front and out in the open since the sixties. Weyrich and Buckley did a much better job of keeping the crazy harnessed and working but at arm's length and plausibly deniable through the 80's and 90's. Now the new apocalyptic elders don't give a damn, so it's all out front and in everyone's face.

39 lostlakehiker  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:26:31am

re: #15 DelusionDeluge

It's easy for any non-hack to identify the rise of Limbaugh and the Lewinsky hearings in the 90s as the beginning of our national divide and end of the Republican party of Reagan. It is amazing that Barack Obama, president precisely because of this strategy and it's flowering in late-90s/early 2000s, is blamed for our nation's divisions. The lack of self-reflection is alarming and sociopathic. Particularly when you consider the concessions Obama has made to conservatives these last four years. When all the House has to do to meet him is let the Bush tax cuts expire, raising the rate 3% on any income over $250,000, and they won't do it out of spite, that's a party that deserves to lose by landslides for infinity.

Would it suffice to let the Bush tax cuts expire (as well as raise rates on 250K+), but write the new law so that apart from this 250K+ tax bump, it's an inflation-indexed version of the pre-Bush-tax-cut code? Because if there's no adjustment for inflation, then in real terms, taxes pop to levels considerably higher than they were just before the Bush tax cuts.

The Obama proposal now on the table is not, not in any real sense, a return to an earlier state of affairs.

40 Charleston Chew  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:26:55am

Seeing that article's pic of Pauline Kael made me suddenly realize that 2012 was the first election in my lifetime that wasn't primarily just Baby Boomers arguing about the 60s again. We finally have moved on as a country.

41 Shiplord Kirel  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:27:35am

Eventually the GOP base will settle down to blaming Romney's relative moderation, his RINO-hood, for the defeat. They will double down on the crazy. Their media and leadership will follow. The result will be the nomination of a full-bore wingnut like Santorum in 2016, with an apocalyptic drubbing at the polls to follow.

42 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:28:42am

DUMBASS, being unemployed and in debt is not Obama's fault.

43 Randall Gross  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:28:46am

re: #41 Shiplord Kirel

Yep, read the NPR post linked here [Link: littlegreenfootballs.com...]

44 Obdicut  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:30:03am

re: #39 lostlakehiker

Um, are you just referring to moving up the various progressive taxation plateaus to higher levels, to account for inflation?

45 OhNoZombies!  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:30:03am

re: #38 Randall Gross

I've not seen it so up front and out in the open since the sixties. Weyrich and Buckley did a much better job of keeping the crazy harnessed and working but at arm's length and plausible deniability through the 80's and 90's. Now the new apocalyptic elders don't give a damn, so it's all out front and in everyone's face.

This is what is so frustrating.

46 lostlakehiker  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:30:37am

re: #41 Shiplord Kirel

Eventually the GOP base will settle down to blaming Romney's relative moderation, his RINO-hood, for the defeat. They will double down on the crazy. Their media and leadership will follow. The result will be the nomination of a full-bore wingnut like Santorum in 2016, with an apocalyptic drubbing at the polls to follow.

Nah---Santorum would carry an easy 50 electoral votes. That's close enough that with some extra effort and a little luck, he would have won. Indeed, he would have won but for the media blaming global warming for the January hurricane that hit Boston.

//

47 Daniel Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:31:16am

Apologies for O/T but breaking at Wired dot com

[Link: littlegreenfootballs.com...]

In an Oct. 26 alumni symposium at the University of Denver, Paula Broadwell said that the CIA annex at the Benghazi consulate came under assault on Sept. 11 because it had earlier “taken a couple of Libyan militia members prisoner and they think the attack on the consulate was an effort to try to get these prisoners back. It’s still being vetted.” (That information was not part of the CIA’s timeline of the Benghazi assault, and Eli Lake of the Daily Beast reports that the CIA has denied any such detention.) “I don’t know if a lot of you have heard this,” Broadwell prefaced her remarks by saying.

Curioser and curioser. Charles, this departs from what the militants themselves said as you pointed out.

48 lostlakehiker  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:31:30am

re: #44 Obdicut

Um, are you just referring to moving up the various progressive taxation plateaus to higher levels, to account for inflation?

To the cutoffs of the alternative minimum tax, which are not automatically indexed for inflation.

49 Shiplord Kirel  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:32:13am

In some ways, it would have been better for the GOP if Santorum or Huckabee had been nominated this year. The Obama landslide would have been awesome and nobody this side of Alex Jones on the sanity scale could muddy the waters with fake fraud charges.
The moral, intellectual, and political bankruptcy of the recent right would be obvious to all, there would be some genuine soul-searching, and the process of re-building the party might finally begin. As it is, the nuts get four more years to work their mischief and rake in their profits before the process can even begin.

50 Killgore Trout  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:34:07am

re: #47 Daniel Ballard

Apologies for O/T but breaking at Wired dot com

[Link: littlegreenfootballs.com...]

It is an interesting new angle. I'm not sure what to make of it.

51 RadicalModerate  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:34:28am

re: #34 HappyWarrior

I still have no respect for Reagan at all for opening his 1980 presidential campaign where Goodman, Chaney, and Schwerner were kidnapped and later killed and talking about "states rights." And I still contend that as bad as Watergate was that the Southern Strategy is the greater blemish on Nixon's record in public life.

Don't forget about Nixon also being responsible for giving credibility to Pat Buchanan. His role in Nixon's "dirty tricks" group, coupled with his helping engineer the "Southern Strategy" - Buchanan is the person who actually coined the term "silent majority" - earned him a spot as one of the people in Ronald Reagan's inner circle.

52 EPR-radar  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:34:49am

re: #41 Shiplord Kirel

Eventually the GOP base will settle down to blaming Romney's relative moderation, his RINO-hood, for the defeat. They will double down on the crazy. Their media and leadership will follow. The result will be the nomination of a full-bore wingnut like Santorum in 2016, with an apocalyptic drubbing at the polls to follow.

Unfortunately, this situation would not probably result in a sufficiently severe defeat for the GOP to cause a real change in the party. By now, we have plenty of Red states that would vote for John Calvin in a Klan robe over any democratic party candidate.

However, defeat would be virtually certain, and the Republican establishment would try to avoid that by putting in some mouthpiece candidate (like Romney) in the primaries.

The civil war over the 2016 GOP nomination should be very interesting --- the establishment has money and power, but no votes, while the wing nuts have the votes.

53 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:35:50am

re: #42 Vicious Babushka

DUMBASS, being unemployed and in debt is not Obama's fault.

[Embedded content]

I thought government wasn't responsible for job creation and that debt is a personal responsibility issue. Derp Kevin, fuckin' derp.

54 Tigger2  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:36:31am

re: #20 Mich-again

Its not going to get better for them, its going to get worse. The ones who left the GOP ranch and voted for Obama in 2012 (like my wife and I) are the worst sort of foe for the GOP, the apostates.

The ones who were lifelong supporters but abandoned ship in the wake of Tea Party racism, anti-science kookery and religious fanaticism are not coming back and instead we are bringing more of the tepid GOP supporters over to this side simply by explaining to friends and family why we left.

It's going to keep getting harder for the GOP to hold onto College degreed, politically moderate, working families.


If they really do double down on the extremism, their support won't just fade away, it will fall off the table.

If the Republicans don't do some changing for the better you're going to see more groups like this.

[Link: www.facebook.com...]

Republicans for Obama: but it's not going to be for Obama it will be for the Dem running at the time.

55 Charleston Chew  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:36:32am

re: #30 lostlakehiker

Two party politics will reemerge when today's Democrat party fractures. Perhaps over the inherent tension between the interests of state employees and the need to face up to fiscal reality. Perhaps over whether to allow wind turbines, or nuclear power, or solar power...all of these carry some local cost to the environment, even as they are our only hopes for the general good of the planet. Perhaps over some other issue where the general public good is in tension with the desires of the party's core supporters.

The Dem factions were all disillusioned for different reasons because it turned out that the President existed within the bounds of reality and was not made of magic.

But it was the GOP that held the coalition together this year. By being so scary-crazy.

56 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:36:49am

re: #47 Daniel Ballard

The CIA says these claims are bullshit.

A spokesperson for the CIA Sunday declined to discuss Broadwell's relationship with Petraeus, whose wife of 37 years, Holly, is the assistant director for service member affairs at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. But the spokesperson did reject Broadwell's allegation that the CIA annex held Libyan militia members as prisoners, telling the Beast:

"The CIA has not had detention authority since January 2009, when Executive Order 13491 was issued. Any suggestion that the Agency is still in the detention business is uninformed and baseless."

57 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:36:58am

re: #51 RadicalModerate

Don't forget about Nixon also being responsible for giving credibility to Pat Buchanan. His role in Nixon's "dirty tricks" group, coupled with his helping engineer the "Southern Strategy" - Buchanan is the person who actually coined the term "silent majority" - earned him a spot as one of the people in Ronald Reagan's inner circle.

Yes, of course. Thanks.

58 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:37:09am

re: #53 HappyWarrior

I thought government wasn't responsible for job creation and that debt is a personal responsibility issue. Derp Kevin, fuckin' derp.

All I know is that during the Bush administration automotive jobs were few and far between, and Big 3 contracts were very short term. That has turned around.

Coincidence?

59 EPR-radar  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:37:19am

re: #51 RadicalModerate

Don't forget about Nixon also being responsible for giving credibility to Pat Buchanan. His role in Nixon's "dirty tricks" group, coupled with his helping engineer the "Southern Strategy" - Buchanan is the person who actually coined the term "silent majority" - earned him a spot as one of the people in Ronald Reagan's inner circle.

The republican establishment has long used the wingnuts as a source of votes and volunteers, without any intention of enacting wing nut policies. Now they have created a Frankenstein monster that is out of their control.

60 Obdicut  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:37:43am

re: #48 lostlakehiker

To the cutoffs of the alternative minimum tax, which are not automatically indexed for inflation.

Okay. AMT needs a permanent solution, definitely. I don't think Obama or the Democrats would generally be opposed to that-- it's mostly middle-class tax relief.

61 Charleston Chew  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:39:45am

re: #54 Tigger2

If the Republicans don't do some changing for the better you're going to see more groups like this.

[Link: www.facebook.com...]

Republicans for Obama

Their slogan should be "We voted for Eisenhower in '52, '56, '08, and '12."

62 EPR-radar  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:39:48am

re: #55 Charleston Chew

The Dem factions were all disillusioned for different reasons because it turned out that the President existed within the bounds of reality and was not made of magic.

But it was the GOP that held the coalition together this year. By being so scary-crazy.

Precisely. If the Republicans can muzzle their most extreme, and find a presentable candidate, their chances for success in 2014 and 2016 are entirely too high.

63 Daniel Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:41:30am

re: #56 Charles Johnson

Noted. At this point I don't know who to believe, unless it's nobody yet. It's not as if mistresses/spokespeople are reliable sources. It's not as if the CIA is shy about lying to protect secrets. I'm still wait and see. wait and see if it takes a Freedom of Information action to sort it out just before the next election.

But what would her motive be to make this up? Just craving the spotlight for a while?

64 OhNoZombies!  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:41:33am

The plus side to this, is that exposure to sunlight is a great disinfectant.
The fact that so many people are willing to discuss the racism and bigotry still exist is huge.
I have hope.

65 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:41:44am

re: #61 Charleston Chew

Their slogan should be "We voted for Eisenhower in '52, '56, '08, and '12."

Ike would be a RINO to them now.

Tax rates during Eisenhower years:
Income >$400,000 91-92%
Capital gains tax: 25%

66 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:42:45am

re: #65 Vicious Babushka

Ike would be a RINO to them now.

So would Nixon and Reagan.

67 makeitstop  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:42:50am

re: #36 Skip Intro

This is pretty bad, plus I recently learned he does ads for Macys, which is now dead to me.

Why does a "high class billionaire" have to do advertising for middle-brow Macys anyway?

He has a clothing line that sells through Macy's.

You know, the made in China 'Trump ties' that Letterman busted him for on the air.

68 EPR-radar  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:43:54am

re: #65 Vicious Babushka

Ike would be a RINO to them now.

Amusingly enough, the Birchers (who are now mainstream in the GOP) regarded Ike as a Communist.

69 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:43:57am

re: #63 Daniel Ballard

I think if the CIA were really holding prisoners secretly, their statement would have been much less direct. The consequences for lying about this would be huge, because as they pointed out they no longer have the authority to do this.

This is a case where Occam's Razor is clearly cutting on the side of the CIA.

70 Obdicut  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:43:57am

re: #63 Daniel Ballard

She's a crazy person? I mean, if the militias were rescuing prisoners, why wouldn't they, y'know, mention that? They tend to be very vocal about that sort of thing.

Given that the only thing I know about this woman is that she sent threatening emails to another woman that were so serious that the FBI got involved, I'm not inclined to credit her with much.

71 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:44:43am

re: #68 EPR-radar

Amusingly enough, the Birchers (who are now mainstream in the GOP) regarded Ike as a Communist.

So did Skousen. Beck and Romney's guy.

72 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:45:18am

Correlation or causation?


73 Sol Berdinowitz  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:46:33am

re: #72 Vicious Babushka

I really do not want to hear anything by or about Donald Trump ever again...

74 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:46:34am

An interesting Wikipedia find:

75 RadicalModerate  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:47:42am

re: #61 Charleston Chew

Their slogan should be "We voted for Eisenhower in '52, '56, '08, and '12."

Eisenhower was far from perfect. Keep in mind the fact that he approved, and gave logistical support (via the CIA) to the military coup in Iran that ousted a democratically-elected Prime Minister (Mohammad Mosaddegh) in 1953 to install a dictator who was friendly to United States business interests - a Shah whose regime was so brutal that the eventual backlash spurred the 1979 revolution that brought us the current crop of Islamic extremists running the country today.

76 Daniel Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:48:48am

re: #70 Obdicut

Agreed. But I don't necessarily hold terror/militia forces in real high regard either. The CIA record on truth telling is best kindly described as umm... variable. Obama has more credibility with me than anyone else involved.

77 Killgore Trout  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:50:31am

re: #63 Daniel Ballard

Noted. At this point I don't know who to believe, unless it's nobody yet. It's not as if mistresses/spokespeople are reliable sources. It's not as if the CIA is shy about lying to protect secrets. I'm still wait and see. wait and see if it takes a Freedom of Information action to sort it out just before the next election.

But what would her motive be to make this up? Just craving the spotlight for a while?

She could have been stretching the truth or making stuff up to spice up her speeches. It's possible but it's also possible that she did have some inside knowledge. If the CIA had recently taken prisoners it's not the kind of thing they'd admit to anyways. Especially if those prisoners were freed in the raid, rendered to another government or sent to a cia blacksite. Obama probably left himself a lot of legal wiggle room on the topic of interrogations and rendition (I'm fine with that) but the Benghazi raid may end up uncovering some not so pleasant facts for lefties.

78 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:52:08am

re: #70 Obdicut

She's a crazy person? I mean, if the militias were rescuing prisoners, why wouldn't they, y'know, mention that? They tend to be very vocal about that sort of thing.

Given that the only thing I know about this woman is that she sent threatening emails to another woman that were so serious that the FBI got involved, I'm not inclined to credit her with much.

Absolutely - if the attackers had been trying to free prisoners they would have been very vocal about it, especially afterward. They'd have no reason to hide that, and plenty of reasons to publicize it.

79 Obdicut  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:52:58am

I wonder if the biography is really just a 400 page fanfic.

80 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:53:15am

re: #77 Killgore Trout

She could have been stretching the truth or making stuff up to spice up her speeches. It's possible but it's also possible that she did have some inside knowledge. If the CIA had recently taken prisoners it's not the kind of thing they'd admit to anyways. Especially if those prisoners were freed in the raid, rendered to another government or sent to a cia blacksite. Obama probably left himself a lot of legal wiggle room on the topic of interrogations and rendition (I'm fine with that) but the Benghazi raid may end up uncovering some not so pleasant facts for lefties.

Why would the raiders make up some shit about a crappy video instead of saying "We are freeing our prisoners!"

81 Hercules Grytpype-Thynne  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:53:24am
Pauline Kaelism

Poor Pauline. Everybody who repeats this story makes her sound like a clueless twit. She was actually making the point that she recognized that she lived in a community that was isolated from the mainstream. The problem Fox viewers (up to and including Romney, apparently) is that they have no idea they're in a cocoon.

82 makeitstop  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:53:42am

The thing that indicates to me that the GOP is in deep-running and long-lasting shit is the sheer amount of talk about secession, nullification and the like on a fairly innocuous site like Facebook.

I expected them to be upset. What I didn't expect was it going on for so long and the linked materials these people are using to support their points to be so absolutely crazy.

Even if the GOP can rein in the candidates they're fielding, they've still got to deal with the rank and file, who by all indications have lost their minds.

83 Daniel Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:58:08am

re: #80 Vicious Babushka

What a circus of unreliability. Terrorists, a mistress and the CIA. None of these are known for truthfulness over the years. All are known for conspiracy, secrets and righteous anger.

84 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:58:52am

Gee, ya think?

85 blueraven  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 11:59:02am

re: #77 Killgore Trout

She could have been stretching the truth or making stuff up to spice up her speeches. It's possible but it's also possible that she did have some inside knowledge. If the CIA had recently taken prisoners it's not the kind of thing they'd admit to anyways. Especially if those prisoners were freed in the raid, rendered to another government or sent to a cia blacksite. Obama probably left himself a lot of legal wiggle room on the topic of interrogations and rendition (I'm fine with that) but the Benghazi raid may end up uncovering some not so pleasant facts for lefties.

That is quite a stretch based on the words of an obviously disturbed woman.

86 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:00:00pm

re: #83 Daniel Ballard

What a circus of unreliability. Terrorists, a mistress and the CIA. None of these are known for truthfulness over the years. All are known for conspiracy, secrets and righteous anger.

Terrorists, while they are in the midst of rioting and killing, generally yell out what they are rioting and killing about. If they believed there were prisoners, they wouldn't make up some silly shit about a video.

87 GunstarGreen  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:01:09pm

re: #21 Charleston Chew

It seemed clear that anyone with foresight would hedge on who wins a close election, instead of making wildly inaccurate predictions that would be indisputably disproved on Nov 6.

Reminds me of "end of the world" cults. The insane ones pick a specific date and when that day comes they look foolish. The sane ones (con artists) never get that specific.

That's just the problem though. The cult leaders of the GOP never do look foolish to the right-wing faithful. Karl Rove wasn't just wrong about the election, he was staggeringly wrong, blowing right past incompetence and straight into the territory of raving idiots.

He still has his job. It's as if nothing happened.

And it's the same with Dick Morris, who's predictions where also preposterously far off from reality. But he still has his job. Nobody in his audience cares, as long as he'll continue telling them that they're right and just have a messaging problem.

Spectacles like this exist. Some men (and women) aren't looking for anything logical, or rational. Some men just want to watch the lib'ruls burn.

And as long as they do, the GOP will continue making useful idiots of them.

88 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:02:13pm

re: #82 makeitstop

The thing that indicates to me that the GOP is in deep-running and long-lasting shit is the sheer amount of talk about secession, nullification and the like on a fairly innocuous site like Facebook.

I expected them to be upset. What I didn't expect was it going on for so long and the linked materials these people are using to support their points to be so absolutely crazy.

Even if the GOP can rein in the candidates they're fielding, they've still got to deal with the rank and file, who by all indications have lost their minds.

The GOP won over millions with talk radio, Faux News, and the RWNJ blogs providing a consistent alternate reality that played into the anger and resentments of the party base. Now those same people turn out to actually believe in all the craziest shit the RW noise machine has been pushing for years.

I think the correct term is Pyrrhic victory.

89 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:04:38pm

Heh:

90 Charleston Chew  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:07:10pm

re: #87 GunstarGreen

That's just the problem though. The cult leaders of the GOP never do look foolish to the right-wing faithful. Karl Rove wasn't just wrong about the election, he was staggeringly wrong, blowing right past incompetence and straight into the territory of raving idiots.

He still has his job. It's as if nothing happened.

And it's the same with Dick Morris, who's predictions where also preposterously far off from reality. But he still has his job. Nobody in his audience cares, as long as he'll continue telling them that they're right and just have a messaging problem.

Spectacles like this exist. Some men (and women) aren't looking for anything logical, or rational. Some men just want to watch the lib'ruls burn.

And as long as they do, the GOP will continue making useful idiots of them.

Chris Christie was notable for calling the President "outstanding" before the election, probably because he was smart enough to know he'd still have to work with the guy next year.

91 allegro  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:08:10pm

re: #63 Daniel Ballard

Noted. At this point I don't know who to believe, unless it's nobody yet. It's not as if mistresses/spokespeople are reliable sources. It's not as if the CIA is shy about lying to protect secrets. I'm still wait and see. wait and see if it takes a Freedom of Information action to sort it out just before the next election.

But what would her motive be to make this up? Just craving the spotlight for a while?

There's quite a lot to question about Broadwell and her motives right about now. She was Patreaus's biographer and mistress by his admission. Why would she have such CIA inside information? Was she in any way affiliated with the CIA beyond her personal relationship with Petraeus? We know that the FBI began investigating due to her threatening emails to a woman she suspected had the General's... attention. This does not indicate a level of stability. She also seems to be enjoying her current notoriety since I've seen promotions of her appearances on at least one talk show.

I find little credibility in her word on most any subject at this point.

92 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:08:41pm

I think it's kind of ironic that the same right wing sources who are always criticizing Muslims in other countries for being irrational when they protest and riot over things like that anti-Islam video are now finding it simply impossible to believe that the attack in Benghazi could have been motivated by the video - even when the attackers themselves said so, and even when there were protests and riots all over the Middle East because of it.

93 Petero1818  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:10:19pm

Interesting Frum article on CNN. I sense a pretty serious split in the party emerging....
[Link: www.cnn.com...]

94 geoduck  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:12:50pm

re: #16 Charleston Chew

He's right about 2 out of 3, but sports are big there like everywhere else. Maybe not Harvard sports (unless you count rowing and beer pong).

Now now..

95 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:12:53pm

re: #93 Petero1818

Interesting Frum article on CNN. I sense a pretty serious split in the party emerging....
[Link: www.cnn.com...]

I posted a comment about this article over here:

[Link: littlegreenfootballs.com...]

96 aagcobb  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:12:56pm

At some point, I expect the GOP to come up with its own Bill Clinton, who can bring the center back into the party and thereby wrest control of it from the crazies. I don't know when this will happen, because the crazy base in the GOP is far larger and better cocooned from reality than the democratic left was. Until that happens, I expect people like David Frumto remain lonely voices in the wilderness.

97 Petero1818  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:15:02pm

re: #95 Charles Johnson

I posted a comment about this article over here:

[Link: littlegreenfootballs.com...]

Indeed you did. Didn't review your articles yet today. Sorry. That'll learn me to post before reading the site!//

98 Shiplord Kirel  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:16:52pm

Veterans Day holiday today.

99 EPR-radar  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:17:22pm

re: #96 aagcobb

At some point, I expect the GOP to come up with its own Bill Clinton, who can bring the center back into the party and thereby rest control of it from the crazies. I don't know when this will happen, because the crazy base in the GOP is far larger and better cocooned from reality than the democratic left was. Until that happens, I expect people like David Frumto remain lonely voices in the wilderness.

It's hard to see how this happens --- the rabid RWNJs are the single largest monolithic voting block in the US, and make up the Republican primary electorate.

100 Charleston Chew  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:17:48pm

re: #96 aagcobb

At some point, I expect the GOP to come up with its own Bill Clinton, who can bring the center back into the party and thereby rest control of it from the crazies. I don't know when this will happen, because the crazy base in the GOP is far larger and better cocooned from reality than the democratic left was. Until that happens, I expect people like David Frumto remain lonely voices in the wilderness.

Speaking of Clinton, the GOP can take comfort in the fact that in the last 20 years, the only way Dems have been able to win a Pres election is by nominating an almost superhumanly-talented 1-in-a-million politician. Don't see anyone like that for 2016.

101 allegro  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:18:12pm

re: #96 aagcobb

At some point, I expect the GOP to come up with its own Bill Clinton, who can bring the center back into the party and thereby rest control of it from the crazies. I don't know when this will happen, because the crazy base in the GOP is far larger and better cocooned from reality than the democratic left was. Until that happens, I expect people like David Frumto remain lonely voices in the wilderness.

Until a candidate for POTUS can answer unequivacably "yes!" at a GOP debate when asked if s/he believes in evolution, climate change, and equal rights for all, the crazies are still in charge.

I won't be holding my breath.

102 Skip Intro  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:18:31pm

re: #87 GunstarGreen

And it's the same with Dick Morris, who's predictions where also preposterously far off from reality. But he still has his job. Nobody in his audience cares, as long as he'll continue telling them that they're right and just have a messaging problem.

I can't remember the last time Dick Morris was right about anything he predicted, unless you allow him to change his predictions like a weather vane in a high wind, which is what he normally does. I was surprised to see him stick with being dead-ass wrong until it was too late to change this time.

Only The Amazing Criswell matches his record for totally inaccurate predictions, but at least Criswell knew he was a fraud.

But, as you say, no one in his target audience gives a rats ass about that.

103 allegro  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:22:27pm

re: #100 Charleston Chew

Speaking of Clinton, the GOP can take comfort in the fact that in the last 20 years, the only way Dems have been able to win a Pres election is by nominating an almost superhumanly-talented 1-in-a-million politician. Don't see anyone like that for 2016.

I do - quite a number of them even. There is a great depth of talent in the Dem party right now. Elizabeth Warren, Deval Patrick, Cory Booker, Julian Castro... I can see any one of them achieving the office of POTUS in the future. Warren would be my first pick right now for 2016.

104 Our Precious Bodily Fluids  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:25:34pm
105 OhNoZombies!  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:27:32pm

re: #103 allegro

I do - quite a number of them even. There is a great depth of talent in the Dem party right now. Elizabeth Warren, Deval Patrick, Cory Booker, Julian Castro... I can see any one of them achieving the office of POTUS in the future. Warren would be my first pick right now for 2016.

Same here.
I don't see one republican with a fraction of the talent in any of those guys.

106 Dancing along the light of day  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:27:51pm

re: #98 Shiplord Kirel

Thank you for your service! I am trying to be a woman who knows her man.
*smooch*

107 erik_t  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:28:11pm

re: #100 Charleston Chew

Speaking of Clinton, the GOP can take comfort in the fact that in the last 20 years, the only way Dems have been able to win a Pres election is by nominating an almost superhumanly-talented 1-in-a-million politician. Don't see anyone like that for 2016.

The same could be said of the GOP, for whatever that's worth.

108 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:32:45pm

re: #107 erik_t

The same could be said of the GOP, for whatever that's worth.

Problem is, the GOP stuck to one gene pool for their winners since 1988.

109 aagcobb  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:32:58pm

re: #100 Charleston Chew

Speaking of Clinton, the GOP can take comfort in the fact that in the last 20 years, the only way Dems have been able to win a Pres election is by nominating an almost superhumanly-talented 1-in-a-million politician. Don't see anyone like that for 2016.

However in four years the electorate will be even less white than it is now, and I don't see the GOP improving its standing with minorities unless it gets its crazy racist base under control.

110 aagcobb  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:33:29pm

re: #108 Lidane

Problem is, the GOP stuck to one gene pool for their winners since 1988.

There's always Jeb Bush.

111 Petero1818  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:33:51pm

re: #101 allegro

Until a candidate for POTUS can answer unequivacably "yes!" at a GOP debate when asked if s/he believes in evolution, climate change, and equal rights for all, the crazies are still in charge.

I won't be holding my breath.

I suspect this will take at least 2 cycles to play out. I think the GOP will nominate a wingnut ticket in 2016. I think they will have to because the base will scream that twice they held their nose and nominated "moderates" and both failed miserably. I suspect we will see Santorum, Palin, Bachmann and other loons duke it out. It will if nothing else be great fun. They will get blown out in a really massive way following which the wing nuts will either quiet down and accept reality ( that Church- not the campaign trail is a great place to express yourself ) or split from the party forming a new party of god fearing white Christians.

112 Targetpractice  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:34:28pm

re: #109 aagcobb

However in four years the electorate will be even less white than it is now, and I don't see the GOP improving its standing with minorities unless it gets its crazy racist base under control.

It's not a matter of getting its crazies under control, it's one of realizing that they can't cater to their base and win over minorities. It's one or the other at this point.

113 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:34:55pm

re: #110 aagcobb

There's always Jeb Bush.

And George P. Bush down the line. You know, for diversity's sake.

114 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:36:29pm

re: #112 Targetpractice

It's not a matter of getting its crazies under control, it's one of realizing that they can't cater to their base and win over minorities. It's one or the other at this point.

Yeah, this.

It's either keep pandering to the angry white guys or realize that pandering solely to them and to white resentment is a losing proposition in a country that's shifting demographically. You can't do both.

115 lostlakehiker  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:36:36pm

re: #65 Vicious Babushka

Ike would be a RINO to them now.

Tax rates during Eisenhower years:
Income >$400,000 91-92%
Capital gains tax: 25%

The Kennedy administration reformed that tax law, cutting the highest rates substantially.

116 Mich-again  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:36:43pm

re: #84 Lidane

Gee, ya think?

[Embedded content]

DON"T CONFUSE THE WEATHER WITH THE CLIMATE! ARGHHHHH!!!

#denier creed.

117 Targetpractice  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:38:15pm

re: #114 Lidane

Yeah, this.

It's either keep pandering to the angry white guys or realize that pandering solely to them and to white resentment is a losing proposition in a country that's shifting demographically. You can't do both.

Ayep, if the base can't get past their fear of minorities, then the door's open, nobody's forcing them to stay in the GOP. I'm sure there's some third party out there that would love legions of aging white racists to prop them up.

118 Mich-again  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:39:09pm

re: #49 Shiplord Kirel

In some ways, it would have been better for the GOP if Santorum or Huckabee had been nominated this year. The Obama landslide would have been awesome and nobody this side of Alex Jones on the sanity scale could muddy the waters with fake fraud charges.
The moral, intellectual, and political bankruptcy of the recent right would be obvious to all, there would be some genuine soul-searching, and the process of re-building the party might finally begin. As it is, the nuts get four more years to work their mischief and rake in their profits before the process can even begin.

You have to hit rock bottom first before you can generate an upward force.

119 GunstarGreen  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:40:23pm

re: #112 Targetpractice

It's not a matter of getting its crazies under control, it's one of realizing that they can't cater to their base and win over minorities. It's one or the other at this point.

This, this, aaaaaand this. The GOP has to choose: Does it want the votes of sensible, moderate people? Or does it want the votes of people that believe homosexuality and atheism should be criminal offenses?

They always try to make it about economics. Here in Georgia we have WSB, which now runs a daily lineup of Boortz, Pillbaugh, Hannity, and Erickson. All four of them mewl constantly about economics and do everything, absolutely EVERYTHING in their power to stay away from social issues.

Because they know they can't win on social issues.

But their candidates keep pandering to the whackjob fundamentalists. And sane people keep taking note of it. And it negatively impacts their electoral prospects.

Unless and until they cut out the gangrenous, festering pit of rot and decay that is their hardcore social-issues base, they don't have a chance in hell in modern America. Even after that they still have slim chances until they adjust their economics.

120 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:41:03pm

re: #117 Targetpractice

Ayep, if the base can't get past their fear of minorities, then the door's open, nobody's forcing them to stay in the GOP. I'm sure there's some third party out there that would love legions of aging white racists to prop them up.

The Constitution Party is practically designed with them in mind.

121 BenghaziHoops  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:41:26pm

re: #113 Lidane

And George P. Bush down the line. You know, for diversity's sake.

The GOP should just go all in for 2016
Nominate Newt and just let it all go..Like the Charge of the light brigade

122 Mich-again  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:41:49pm

re: #69 Charles Johnson

I think if the CIA were really holding prisoners secretly, their statement would have been much less direct. The consequences for lying about this would be huge, because as they out they no longer have the authority to do this.

This is a case where Occam's Razor is clearly cutting on the side of the CIA.

BUT you can never kill a conspiracy theory. Any evidence that belies the conspiracy is just more proof of how far the other side will go to conceal the truth.

123 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:42:31pm

re: #121 Digital Display

The GOP should just go all for 2016
Nominate Newt and just let it all go..Like the Charge of the light brigade

Santorum/Gingrich, just for the epic loss.

They finally got rid of Mitt Romney by running him. Maybe if they ran Santorum and Newt on the same ticket, it would be a twofer political career death.

124 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:44:57pm
125 engineer cat  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:45:21pm

Polls Still In Coma After Election Overdose

mumbling 'i dowanna goto rehab' and gettin th' shakes

126 Targetpractice  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:45:38pm

Even Josh Marshall pointed out the error in focusing on indie voters, namely that the GOP kept drawing in all the indies who'd jumped ship in the lead-up to '10, but still kept voting GOP. Those were the same folks who are now making noises about how they can't believe the party lost and how it might have won if it'd nominated Crazy Uncle Liberty.

127 allegro  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:45:58pm

re: #119 GunstarGreen

They always try to make it about economics. Here in Georgia we have WSB, which now runs a daily lineup of Boortz, Pillbaugh, Hannity, and Erickson. All four of them mewl constantly about economics and do everything, absolutely EVERYTHING in their power to stay away from social issues.

Because they know they can't win on social issues.

They can't win on economic ones either, partly in thanks to OWS that changed the conversation from austerity and debt to income inequality. The GOP was taken out for being the party of the rich and for the rich as much as any social issue. The party certainly has no "fiscal responsibility" leg to stand on though many still argue that party virtue, as easily disproven by reality as it is.

128 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:46:26pm

re: #125 engineer cat

Polls Still In Coma After Election Overdose

mumbling 'i dowanna goto rehab' and gettin th' shakes

129 engineer cat  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:46:50pm

GOP Still In Fugue State, Denial, After Bubble Breach

"what is this 'reality' thing you keep going on about?"

130 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:47:32pm

The right wing is taking their loss in stride:

131 Mich-again  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:47:56pm

re: #129 engineer cat

GOP Still In Fugue State, Denial, After Bubble Breach

"what is this 'reality' thing you keep going on about?"

Reality is a librul plot.

132 BenghaziHoops  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:47:59pm

re: #125 engineer cat

Polls Still In Coma After Election Overdose

mumbling 'i dowanna goto rehab' and gettin th' shakes

The only pols allowed for the next 36 months are dancer polls.. :)

133 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:48:48pm

re: #123 Lidane

Santorum/Gingrich, just for the epic loss.

They finally got rid of Mitt Romney by running him. Maybe if they ran Santorum and Newt on the same ticket, it would be a twofer political career death.

They would need SOME diversity, let's say Santorum/Bachmann. (eek!)

134 engineer cat  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:48:48pm

re: #126 Targetpractice

Even Josh Marshall pointed out the error in focusing on indie voters, namely that the GOP kept drawing in all the indies who'd jumped ship in the lead-up to '10, but still kept voting GOP. Those were the same folks who are now making noises about how they can't believe the party lost and how it might have won if it'd nominated Crazy Uncle Liberty.

they seem to have missed the fact that most people calling themselves 'independants' these days are gop voters too ashamed to call themselves 'republicans' anymore

135 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:50:36pm
136 Targetpractice  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:51:58pm

re: #127 allegro

They can't win on economic ones either, partly in thanks to OWS that changed the conversation from austerity and debt to income inequality. The GOP was taken out for being the party of the rich and for the rich as much as any social issue. The party certainly has no "fiscal responsibility" leg to stand on though many still argue that party virtue, as easily disproven by reality as it is.

Yep, let's take a second and thank Occupy for giving us "the 1%" and making Romney's "47%" comments behind closed doors relevant to this election. More than anything else, they woke people up to the severe income disparity in this nation and turned that hatred on the people that Romney personified.

137 Mich-again  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:52:54pm

re: #133 Vicious Babushka

They would need SOME diversity, let's say Santorum/Bachmann. (eek!)

I think 2016 is when the Tea Party bolts from the GOP if anyone other than Ron or Rand Paul wins the nomination. Good luck with that moderation thingie..

138 Petero1818  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:54:45pm

re: #133 Vicious Babushka

They would need SOME diversity, let's say Santorum/Bachmann. (eek!)

There is no question in my mind that they will put a woman or a visible minority on the ticket. They simply don't understand the difference between style and substance. So I would expect at least 1 of these 4 and perhaps 2 on the 2016 ticket. Palin/Bachmann/Jindal/Rubio. The fact that they will continue to speak to policies that discriminate against women and minorities will seem irrelevant to them.

139 Dark_Falcon  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:54:51pm

re: #132 Digital Display

The only pols allowed for the next 36 months are dancer polls.. :)

Sorry, but the interval will be shorter than that. But 2013 will be relatively poll free, I hope.

140 erik_t  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:56:48pm

re: #137 Mich-again

I think 2016 is when the Tea Party bolts from the GOP if anyone other than Ron or Rand Paul wins the nomination. Good luck with that moderation thingie..

The sooner the better. An approximation of sanity can probably only come by the most insane portions of the base abdicating their position of power.

141 Targetpractice  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:57:43pm

re: #139 Dark_Falcon

Sorry, but the interval will be shorter than that. But 2013 will be relatively poll free, I hope.

"Relatively" being the operative word.

142 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:58:05pm

re: #138 Petero1818

There is no question in my mind that they will put a woman or a visible minority on the ticket. They simply don't understand the difference between style and substance. So I would expect at least 1 of these 4 and perhaps 2 on the 2016 ticket. Palin/Bachmann/Jindal/Rubio. The fact that they will continue to speak to policies that discriminate against women and minorities will seem irrelevant to them.

Then there will be the inevitable shock at a loss, followed by the inevitable cries of Democrats/liberals being racist and/or sexist.

143 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:58:15pm
144 Mich-again  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 12:59:09pm

re: #143 Lidane

That was worth retweeting..

145 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:01:19pm

re: #142 Lidane

Then there will be the inevitable shock at a loss, followed by the inevitable cries of Democrats/liberals being racist and/or sexist.

Well that's what they're doing for West. Claiming that liberals hate black conservatives so much that's the reason West was targeted. Nevermind that West is batshit. They're claiming the same thing about Mia Love in Utah and ignoring that Love was challenging an incumbent and two it's Utah where the percentage of self described liberal voters is probably less than the digits on our hands.

146 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:04:11pm

Ha, Grover Norquist is claiming that the president has never talked civilly. Says the man who blackballs anyone who dares to even consider a tax increase.

147 Petero1818  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:04:18pm

re: #142 Lidane

Then there will be the inevitable shock at a loss, followed by the inevitable cries of Democrats/liberals being racist and/or sexist.

I just expect a sort of shallow knee jerk reaction like this. They will sit around saying:

look at all the African Americans who voted for Obama just cuz he is black. We need to run a latino. and we need to run a woman so we can win the female vote too. Don't you see, if we win the latino and the women's vote we win the election. What could possibly make us lose?

148 BenghaziHoops  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:06:11pm

re: #139 Dark_Falcon

Sorry, but the interval will be shorter than that. But 2013 will be relatively poll free, I hope.

Hi D_F! hope things are going well for ya..
I'm off to a wake this evening.. It's going to be pretty sad.
On a lighter note.. I'm drinking the most rock'n ice coffee, curled up on the couch

149 erik_t  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:06:51pm

re: #147 Petero1818

I just expect a sort of shallow knee jerk reaction like this. They will sit around saying:

It worked with Sarah Palin!

Morans.

150 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:07:42pm

re: #147 Petero1818

I just expect a sort of shallow knee jerk reaction like this. They will sit around saying:

They're already saying that the problem is with the GOP's messaging, not its message.

You know, because a Latino version of El Rushbo selling the same fail in Spanish will somehow magically erase the 3-to-1 Latino vote margin between Obama and Romney.

151 Donna Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:09:33pm

re: #149 erik_t

It worked with Sarah Palin!

Morans.

Ummmm, don't you mean "Morons" ? I have never heard anyone called a "Moran" Before.... I'm just saying.... Unless you want to quote that immortal rabbit Bugs Bunny by calling them a "Maroon".....

152 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:10:18pm

re: #151 Donna Ballard

Ummmm, don't you mean "Morons" ? I have never heard anyone called a "Moran" Before.... I'm just saying.... Unless you want to quote that immortal rabbit Bugs Bunny by calling them a "Maroon".....

[Link: knowyourmeme.com...]

153 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:10:19pm
154 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:10:20pm

re: #151 Donna Ballard

Ummmm, don't you mean "Morons" ? I have never heard anyone called a "Moran" Before.... I'm just saying.... Unless you want to quote that immortal rabbit Bugs Bunny by calling them a "Maroon".....

It's from this infamous sign
Image: morans.jpg

155 BenghaziHoops  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:11:14pm

re: #151 Donna Ballard

Ummmm, don't you mean "Morons" ? I have never heard anyone called a "Moran" Before.... I'm just saying.... Unless you want to quote that immortal rabbit Bugs Bunny by calling them a "Maroon".....

Sssshhhh.. Wabbits..
Hi you

156 Petero1818  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:11:50pm

re: #150 Lidane

sadly, there is a portion of the population that will vote this way. I think it applies to every racial demographic. No matter what they are saying there will be white folks who vote for white folks because they are white. Black folks who vote for black candidates because they are black. Latinos who do the same. I still remember sitting with my Jewish grandmother years ago watching the local news about a Jewish guy who had been arrested for swindling a bunch of people out of some money. Her comment: "can't be true. Not a Jewish boy". To be fair she was 95 and the Jewish boy was probably 50. /

157 Donna Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:12:44pm

re: #154 HappyWarrior

It's from this infamous sign
Image: morans.jpg

Ahhhh, okay I gotch ya. I haven't been posting for awhile and missed that one. But I still like Bugs Bunny's version better // ;-)

158 goddamnedfrank  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:13:06pm

LOL. I'd almost forgotten about this guy:

Totally disappointed, man,” Hartsburg told POLITICO. “I’m the guy who has egg all over his face, but instead of egg, it’s a big Romney/Ryan tattoo. It’s there for life.”

159 Dark_Falcon  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:13:15pm

re: #156 Petero1818

sadly, there is a portion of the population that will vote this way. I think it applies to every racial demographic. No matter what they are saying there will be white folks who vote for white folks because they are white. Black folks who vote for black candidates because they are black. Latinos who do the same. I still remember sitting with my Jewish grandmother years ago watching the local news about a Jewish guy who had been arrested for swindling a bunch of people out of some money. Her comment: "can't be true. Not a Jewish boy". To be fair she was 95 and the Jewish boy was probably 50. /

"No True Scotsman" rears its ugly head.

160 Donna Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:13:41pm

re: #155 Digital Display

Sssshhhh.. Wabbits..
Hi you

Hi H.H.! Or is that D.D. now? How it going?

161 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:14:16pm

re: #158 goddamnedfrank

LOL. I'd almost forgotten about this guy:

That guy is right up there with this loser:

[Link: www.engadget.com...]

162 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:14:56pm

re: #157 Donna Ballard

Ahhhh, okay I gotch ya. I haven't been posting for awhile and missed that one. But I still like Bugs Bunny's version better // ;-)

Goes all the way back to the Bush years. But yeah I like Bugs' better too. Love me some Loony Toons.

163 Dancing along the light of day  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:16:40pm

re: #132 Digital Display

The only pols allowed for the next 36 months are dancer polls.. :)

Um, those are poles...
FYI!

164 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:17:51pm

re: #161 Lidane

That guy is right up there with this loser:

[Link: www.engadget.com...]

[Link: www.politico.com...]
Related. Remember this guy? Heh. I remember seeing Sarah Palin tattoos four years ago. It's people like that give people who get tattoos a bad name and I am not just saying that because of the politics but because I find political tattoos by and large tacky.

165 Petero1818  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:18:07pm

re: #159 Dark_Falcon

Now that I think about my late grandmother, another story comes to mind. I was 16 and wearing a Lynyrd Skynyrd button on my jean jacket (don't ask), and to be fair it was not that big a picture but it was a picture of the entire band and she asked me if it was a picture of our whole family.// Off topic but a funny memory nonetheless. She was a lot of fun.

166 erik_t  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:18:49pm

re: #164 HappyWarrior

[Link: www.politico.com...]
Related. Remember this guy? Heh. I remember seeing Sarah Palin tattoos four years ago. It's people like that give people who get tattoos a bad name and I am not just saying that because of the politics but because I find political tattoos by and large tacky.

Luckily nobody's going to remember what that represents in, oh, about three weeks.

167 Donna Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:18:58pm

re: #162 HappyWarrior

Goes all the way back to the Bush years. But yeah I like Bugs' better too. Love me some Loony Toons.

Brings back some very happy memories..... I just found an old drink bottle given to me by a friend, its shaped like Marvin Martin... my fav!

I wish some of those maroons out there would learn how to spell... But then we wouldn't have all the fun of mocking their lack of intelligence now would we? The bottom of the gene pool is eminently entertaining....

168 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:19:21pm

re: #157 Donna Ballard

Ahhhh, okay I gotch ya. I haven't been posting for awhile and missed that one. But I still like Bugs Bunny's version better // ;-)

That's because Looney Tunes is immortal and applicable to all sorts of things even now. For example, this clip pretty much sums up Obama's campaigns:

169 BenghaziHoops  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:20:07pm

re: #160 Donna Ballard

Hi H.H.! Or is that D.D. now? How it going?

Missed ya..Can't believe the holidays are fast approaching us.

170 BenghaziHoops  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:21:25pm

re: #163 Dancing along the light of day

Um, those are poles...
FYI!

Spell check /on
Idiot check /off

171 HappyWarrior  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:22:43pm

re: #167 Donna Ballard

Brings back some very happy memories..... I just found an old drink bottle given to me by a friend, its shaped like Marvin Martin... my fav!

I wish some of those maroons out there would learn how to spell... But then we wouldn't have all the fun of mocking their lack of intelligence now would we? The bottom of the gene pool is eminently entertaining....

Good times. I always liked Daffy for some reason. He was so stubborn and persistent.

172 Donna Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:23:41pm

re: #169 Digital Display

Missed ya..Can't believe the holidays are fast approaching us.

I know, we have two new family members this year... My older Brother got married and his Daughter had a darling baby boy. Sigh, how time fly's...

I'm only popping in for a few moments, I have house work to get done, but I'll be around more often in the future, Dan gave me his old laptop when he got a new one so I can blog more often.

173 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:25:14pm

re: #164 HappyWarrior

It's people like that give people who get tattoos a bad name and I am not just saying that because of the politics but because I find political tattoos by and large tacky.

Political tattoos are ridiculous. It's like getting a tattoo of a celebrity on your body. Why? I mean, I understand things like a book quote or a lyric that means a lot to a person, or hell, even something fandom related if you're that dedicated to a band or a comic book character or whatever, but a real person that you'll likely never meet on your body?

I'd never tattoo anything political on my body. If I'm putting something on my skin permanently, it's going to have some meaning to me beyond an election.

174 Dark_Falcon  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:25:37pm

re: #168 Lidane

Here's the full cartoon:

175 Charles Johnson  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:26:36pm

Testing...

176 Donna Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:27:37pm

re: #171 HappyWarrior

Good times. I always liked Daffy for some reason. He was so stubborn and persistent.

Some of the funniest scenes were of Daffy and Bugs going back and forth... Duck season... Wabbit season.... and so on... I just bought the Loony Tunes Platinum Edition DVD collection... I love to watch them when Dan's not home. He doesn't like cartoons for some reason.

177 Donna Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:31:14pm

BBIAM, House work to get done ya know....

178 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:32:13pm

re: #176 Donna Ballard

I love to watch them when Dan's not home. He doesn't like cartoons for some reason.

ZOMG HEATHEN! Break out the torches and pitchforks!

///

I kid, I kid. Still, how can someone not like Looney Tunes? Come on! Foghorn Leghorn ranting is always a classic:

179 Donna Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:34:46pm

re: #178 Lidane

///

I kid, I kid. Still, how can someone not like Looney Tunes? Come on! Foghorn Leghorn ranting is always a classic:

[Embedded content]

Thanks for the memory....What about that silly little chicken hawk? God I loved that little monster... I laughed for days the last time I saw that cartoon...

180 Big Steve  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:34:59pm
181 Daniel Ballard  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:38:39pm

re: #179 Donna Ballard

Bring Back Speedy Gonzalez and I'm in.

182 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:42:21pm
183 wrenchwench  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:50:52pm

re: #182 Lidane

[Embedded content]

They'll still be able to type, though....

184 Dark_Falcon  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 1:59:56pm

re: #181 Daniel Ballard

Bring Back Speedy Gonzalez and I'm in.

Well, so much for Latino outreach from you.

///

185 wrenchwench  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 2:07:24pm

re: #184 Dark_Falcon

Well, so much for Latino outreach from you.

///

No joke. Speedy has been considered an offensive stereotype character for a long time. Even Fox News recognizes that.

186 Lidane  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 2:11:50pm

re: #185 wrenchwench

No joke. Speedy has been considered an offensive stereotype character for a long time. Even Fox News recognizes that.

Which is bizarre, because Speedy himself was the opposite of the stereotype of Latinos. It was the other mice around him that fit all the negatives, since they were usually shown as drunk and lazy.

187 Skip Intro  Mon, Nov 12, 2012 5:41:36pm

re: #181 Daniel Ballard

Bring Back Speedy Gonzalez and I'm in.

May as well grab the Frito Bandito while you're at it.

188 JABaker  Wed, Nov 14, 2012 5:58:46am

re: #7 Charles Johnson

Not to mention acquiring millions from certain billionaire rubes.


This article has been archived.
Comments are closed.

^ back to top ^

TwitterFacebook

Turn off all ads for a full year by subscribing!
For about 33 cents a day (per month) or 22 cents a day (per year), our subscription option turns off all advertisements at LGF!
Read more...

► LGF Headlines

  • Loading...

► Tweeted Articles

  • Loading...

► Tweeted Pages

  • Loading...

► Top 10 Comments

  • Loading...

► Bottom Comments

  • Loading...

► Recent Comments

  • Loading...

► Tools/Info

► Tag Cloud

► Contact

You must have Javascript enabled to use the contact form.
Your email:

Subject:

Message:


Messages may be published unless you request otherwise.
Tech Note:
Using the Contact Form
LGF Pages

This button leads to the main index of LGF Pages, our user-submitted articles. You can post your own LGF Pages simply by registering a free account with us.

Create a Page

This is the LGF Pages posting bookmarklet. To use it, drag this button to your browser's bookmark bar, and title it 'LGF Pages' (or whatever you like). Then browse to a site you want to post, select some text on the page to use for a quote, click the bookmarklet, and the Pages posting window will appear with the title, text, and any embedded video or audio files already filled in, ready to go.

Or... you can just click this button to open the Pages posting window right away.

Last updated: 2014-03-07 2:19 pm PST

LGF User's Guide
Recent Pages
wheat-dogghazi-bola-trality
See How Red Tweeters and Blue Tweeters Ignore Each Other on Ferguson - Quartz
It won't come as a surprise to anyone monitoring Twitter reactions to the events in Ferguson, MO, but there are essentially two isolated and polarized groups talking at each other and paying no attention to the other side's arguments. Emma ...

53 minutes ago
Views: 55 • Comments: 0
Tweets: 3 • Rating: 0
nines09
Christie Vetoes Pig Crate Bill In Controversial Move
A distinct lack of "professional courtesy." Yeah. I said it. Chump Change. "Hello. I'm pandering. Can you tell? Didn't think so. Sucker." Not even close.

3 hours, 58 minutes ago
Views: 70 • Comments: 0
Tweets: 0 • Rating: 0
Indy GOP Refugee
LAPD Officers Surround Ferguson Marchers Downtown
LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- A crowd of about 80 protesters was surrounded by LAPD officers after about an hour-long march through downtown Los Angeles Friday night. People gathered at Grand Park at 3 p.m. to begin a march to ...

4 hours, 33 minutes ago
Views: 90 • Comments: 1
Tweets: 1 • Rating: 0
Randall Gross
Pregnant St. Louis Woman Loses Left Eye After Police Officer Shoots Non-Lethal Round at Car
A pregnant St. Louis woman lost her left eye after a violent run-in with law enforcement earlier this week. Dornnella Conners says an officer fired a non-lethal bean-bag round at the car she was in - shattering the passenger ...

10 hours, 6 minutes ago
Views: 151 • Comments: 2
Tweets: 0 • Rating: 1
The Vicious Fergushka
The Scientific Explanation of Why People Kill Each Other Over TVs on Black Friday
More: The Scientific Explanation of Why People Kill Each Other Over TVs on Black Friday What causes people to kick, shove and even stab each other on Black Friday? Each year there are reports of violence during the Black Friday ...

4 days, 11 hours ago
Views: 550 • Comments: 6
Tweets: 7 • Rating: 2
Skip Intro
Anti-Gay Hate Preacher Accidentally Tweets 4,000 Followers Cartoon Clip of Him ‘Confessing’ to Be a ‘Homosexual Sodomite’
Adam Reakes Promotes Truth That Starbucks Markets Semen Laced Lattes http://t.co/RY06dEEb0I— James David Manning (@DrJamesDManning) November 20, 2014

4 days, 13 hours ago
Views: 725 • Comments: 0
Tweets: 0 • Rating: 1
Lumberhead
One Man Should Not Dictate Immigration Policy
Well played. You know, the more I mull over the Republican complaint about how immigration reform is being implemented, the more I sympathize with them. Public policy, especially on big, hot button issues like immigration shouldn't be made by one ...

5 days, 6 hours ago
Views: 483 • Comments: 6
Tweets: 0 • Rating: 7
teleskiguy
“Chelsea Hotel” performed by Tal Wilkenfeld
I first saw Austrailian bass player Tal Wilkenfeld play with Jeff Beck (not live, mind you. On YouTube) and was amazed at her skills and chops. She was only 20 when she scored that gig. She's coming into her own ...

1 week ago
Views: 338 • Comments: 0
Tweets: 0 • Rating: 5
FemNaziBitch
History of Laws Concerning Immigration and Naturalization in the United States -WIKI
The United States Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787. Article I, section 8, clause 4 of the Constitution expressly gives the United States Congress the power to establish a uniform rule of naturalization.[1] Pursuant to this power, Congress ...

1 week ago
Views: 456 • Comments: 1
Tweets: 1 • Rating: 3
MichaelJ
COMFORTABLY NUMB - Peahi Nov 12 on Vimeo
Channel angle of the Nov 12th swell at Peahi.

1 week, 4 days ago
Views: 592 • Comments: 0
Tweets: 1 • Rating: 2
 Frank says:

Kid's heads are filled with so many nonfacts that when they get out of school they're totally unprepared to do anything. They can't read, they can't write, they can't think. Talk about child abuse. The U.S. school system as a whole qualifies. -- Discussing the state of the education system in America - Playboy magazine, April 1993.