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Colin Powell: The GOP Has a ‘Dark Vein of Intolerance’

Off the rails
Politics • Views: 23,782

After watching Colin Powell interviewed on today’s Meet the Press, the only real question that remains is: why does he still consider himself a Republican? Because I can guarantee that most Republicans don’t see him that way; they see him as a traitor.

Eventually, Powell and David Frum and the other vanishing “moderate Republicans” are going to have to face facts and realize that their party has left them behind, on a march toward extremism, racism, and conspiracy theories. This is the Republican Party of the 21st century.

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196 comments

1 bratwurst  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:07:12am

Ah, now I know why Mark Levin exhorted his fans not to watch the Sunday morning talk shows before signing off on Friday night.

2 Pawn of the Oppressor  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:09:13am

puts envelope against big purple sparkly hat
“Racist epithets and accusations of treason”.
tears open envelope, blows in it, extracts paper, reads
“What can you find in the comments underneath this story right now?”

3 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:10:26am

He’s absolutely right and I totally expect two things to happen from him saying this: 1) He’ll get accused of being racist himself and 2) he’ll be called racial slurs. To me though as I said in the page about this subject, this isn’t a new problem for the GOP and I think it goes back to the Southern Strategy which Nixon first started but I’d argue that Reagan and the first Bush perfected. The GOP continues to show itself hostile to minorities and issues minorities deem important. I do wonder what’s taken him so long to say this though.

4 Obdicut  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:11:33am

I was just watching the West Wing and thinking what an improbable GOP candidate Vinnick is, a pro-choice Republican winning the GOP nod.

Recognizing a problem in your party and fixing it is really freaking hard. I don’t know how the GOP can do it, but I know they have to do it.

5 Interesting Times  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:13:28am

re: #4 Obdicut

Recognizing a problem in your party and fixing it is really freaking hard. I don’t know how the GOP can do it, but I know they have to do it.

As long as enough tribalists in gerrymandered districts vote their way, they won’t. Too many American voters continue to reward their horrendous behavior.

6 Mattand  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:13:48am
Eventually, Powell and David Frum and the other vanishing “moderate Republicans” are going to have to face facts and realize that their party has left them behind, on a march toward extremism, racism, and conspiracy theories. This is the Republican Party of the 21st century.

I always wonder about that regarding the Republicans who post here.

I don’t expect them to suddenly jump up down and scream “Obama RULZ!!”, but the whole GOP is still in this “Destroy Obama or destroy the country” mindset. I just don’t get why a rational person keeps supporting that party.

7 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:15:12am

re: #6 Mattand

I just don’t get why a rational person keeps supporting that party.

Ah. ‘Rational’. I think I see your problem.

8 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:15:25am

re: #6 Mattand

I always wonder about that regarding the Republicans who post here.

I don’t expect them to suddenly jump up down and scream “Obama RULZ!!”, but the whole GOP is still in this “Destroy Obama or destroy the country” mindset. I just don’t get why a rational person keeps supporting that party.

I still remember feeling bewildered by Lincoln Chafee’s excuse at the time why he couldn’t leave the party. Something about Abraham Lincoln and being named for him. Thing is the Republican Party at least in my life time has not stood for the principles Lincoln did.

9 Political Atheist  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:18:15am

re: #4 Obdicut

I was just watching the West Wing and thinking what an improbable GOP candidate Vinnick is, a pro-choice Republican winning the GOP nod.

Recognizing a problem in your party and fixing it is really freaking hard. I don’t know how the GOP can do it, but I know they have to do it.

Back then it was quite possible. That was a far better time for moderates on the right.

10 Mattand  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:18:31am

re: #8 HappyWarrior

I still remember feeling bewildered by Lincoln Chafee’s excuse at the time why he couldn’t leave the party. Something about Abraham Lincoln and being named for him. Thing is the Republican Party at least in my life time has not stood for the principles Lincoln did.

Yeah, I saw some Facebook graphic delineating the Democratic Party’s admittedly shitty history regarding civil rights.

The thing that the graphic conveniently left out is that the Democrats finally got their shit together. The Republicans rushed to fill the Angry White Voter gap that was left behind.

11 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:23:16am

re: #10 Mattand

Yeah, I saw some Facebook graphic delineating the Democratic Party’s admittedly shitty history regarding civil rights.

The thing that the graphic conveniently left out is that the Democrats finally got their shit together. The Republicans rushed to fill the Angry White Voter gap that was left behind.

Precisely. The last half century the Republican Party has arguably ran away from its strong historical record on Civil Rights. I think the Southern Strategy has to be discussed here but also Nixon embracing Strom Thurmond for support too which goes with that.

12 HoosierHoops  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:27:39am

After watching Colin Powell interviewed on today’s Meet the Press, the only real question that remains is: why does he still consider himself a Republican?

Come on in Gen. Powell.. The water is fine

13 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:27:45am

Have to say the other big turning point is nominating Goldwater. I don’t feel as if Goldwater was a bigot but the second the GOP nominated a man opposed to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 for president, they lost any real claim to being superior on Civil Rights. And it continues today when they nominate people like Mitt Romney who were previously somewhat decent on gay rights but now run to the right on those issues to appease the base.I’m not sure what’s the bigger problem with the GOP- the base or the politicians that enable the base.

14 Iwouldprefernotto  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:28:02am

Eventually, Powell and David Frum and the other vanishing “moderate Republicans” are going to have to face facts and realize that their party has left them behind,

If they could “face facts” they would have left long ago. The Republican party is going to have to destroy itself first.

15 jaunte  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:29:51am

Powell: “Why do senior Republican leaders tolerate this sort of discussion within the party?”

They agree with it.

16 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:30:53am

re: #15 jaunte

Powell: “Why do senior Republican leaders tolerate this sort of discussion within the party?”

They agree with it.

or they care about having power more than standing up to bigotry and intolerance.

17 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:31:34am

I’m still registered Republican. It’s MY party and these assholes are crashing it. I’m not leaving. In fact, I urge EVERYBODY to join the Republican Party. The only why to disinfect the party is to get these clowns out in the primary process. Too many low information voters think guys like Chris Christie can straighten out the party. Problem with that is a Republican can’t do anything without the tea party caucus, and there are still too many reactionaries infesting the state legislatures. So we need to take this thing viral. Tell all your friends to register Republican. They can even run in primaries against incumbent wingnuts. As Christine O’Donnell and Sharon Engel showed, a primary is winnable, especially if you can get your friends to register with you. It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

18 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:32:13am

Cue the outrage.

19 Iwouldprefernotto  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:32:33am

re: #15 jaunte

The Irony is that if Romney had stood up to some of the extremists, he would have had a better chance of defeating Obama. But he couldn’t even stand up to the rape comments.

20 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:33:22am

re: #19 Iwouldprefernotto

The Irony is that if Romney had stood up to some of the extremists, he would have had a better chance of defeating Obama. But he couldn’t even stand up to the rape comments.

Well that’s because Mitt Romney’s a cowardly spineless hack.

21 Iwouldprefernotto  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:35:27am

re: #20 HappyWarrior

Well that’s because Mitt Romney’s a cowardly spineless hack.

But remember it’s Obama (the socialist) that can’t stand up to his own party.

22 Obdicut  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:36:46am

re: #17 SteveMcG

It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

I don’t think another inversion of the parties is helpful. I don’t think we need to have a constant number of racists and idiots. It highly depends on how many powerful and influential people are promoting racism and idiocy.

23 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:38:06am

re: #22 Obdicut

I don’t think another inversion of the parties is helpful. I don’t think we need to have a constant number of racists and idiots. It highly depends on how many powerful and influential people are promoting racism and idiocy.

They were pretty well quarantined when they were Democrats. Back then theretheir racism pretty much only infected the south.

24 Iwouldprefernotto  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:39:54am

re: #17 SteveMcG

I’m still registered Republican. It’s MY party and these assholes are crashing it. I’m not leaving. In fact, I urge EVERYBODY to join the Republican Party. The only why to disinfect the party is to get these clowns out in the primary process. Too many low information voters think guys like Chris Christie can straighten out the party. Problem with that is a Republican can’t do anything without the tea party caucus, and there are still too many reactionaries infesting the state legislatures. So we need to take this thing viral. Tell all your friends to register Republican. They can even run in primaries against incumbent wingnuts. As Christine O’Donnell and Sharon Engel showed, a primary is winnable, especially if you can get your friends to register with you. It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

In what universe is this even possible?

25 allegro  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:40:18am

re: #23 SteveMcG

They were pretty well quarantined when they were Democrats. Back then there racism pretty much only infected the south.

I was born in Boston, grew up mostly in Chicago. Racism has never been limited to the south.

26 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:40:19am

re: #17 SteveMcG

This presumes there’s something in the Republican Party that’s worth saving. Consider me unconvinced.

27 sattv4u2  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:41:28am

re: #25 allegro

I was born in Boston, grew up mostly in Chicago. Racism has never been limited to the south.

Same here. Boy, did I see the ugly!!

28 Obdicut  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:41:46am

re: #23 SteveMcG

They were pretty well quarantined when they were Democrats. Back then theretheir racism pretty much only infected the south.

Yeah, but that meant it really sucked to be a black person in the South. This is what’s happening now— they’re slowly quarantining off into the white male party. But in areas where they dominate they can really make things suck.

29 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:41:47am

re: #23 SteveMcG

They were pretty well quarantined when they were Democrats. Back then theretheir racism pretty much only infected the south.

Uh are you forgetting that the KKK was prominent in Indiana, Orange County, New Jersey, etc. The South’s record on race sucks but let’s not act like racism was only a problem in that region and that the racists were only Democrats. Lest we forget that the KKK supported Republicans too.

30 Charles Johnson  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:42:04am

I don’t know where this is going to end, but I don’t think the Republican Party will ever renounce the far right loons. It’s an integral part of their appeal to an ever-shrinking audience of reactionary throwbacks.

Maybe a third party will appear, but the odds against this are pretty long, too.

As far as I can see, the extremists have the GOP in a death grip.

31 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:42:35am

I made a speech like this in my public speaking class. First, when normal people start registering, they’ll think their outreach is working and they’ll be delighted. Second, when they realize that people of different races and religions and orientations are joining, they’ll know that they weren’t racists all along. Then, when they finally realize that they’re outnumbered in their own party, they’ll go looking for a new home they can take over.

32 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:43:18am

re: #17 SteveMcG

I’m still registered Republican. It’s MY party and these assholes are crashing it. I’m not leaving. In fact, I urge EVERYBODY to join the Republican Party. The only why to disinfect the party is to get these clowns out in the primary process. Too many low information voters think guys like Chris Christie can straighten out the party. Problem with that is a Republican can’t do anything without the tea party caucus, and there are still too many reactionaries infesting the state legislatures. So we need to take this thing viral. Tell all your friends to register Republican. They can even run in primaries against incumbent wingnuts. As Christine O’Donnell and Sharon Engel showed, a primary is winnable, especially if you can get your friends to register with you. It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

Racists and idiots need to be marginalized, not in a federal governing party.

33 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:43:39am

The thing is there is no DLC or New Democrat like movement in the Republican Party right now. Even when the Dems were being landslided in the 80’s, you could see the roots of a new Democratic Party. I don’t see that in today’s Republican Party. I do see more extremists e.g. your Rand Pauls, Marco Rubios, Paul Ryans, etc. But people willing to call out GOP orthodoxy on social issues? Notta chance.

34 allegro  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:43:54am

re: #31 SteveMcG

I made a speech like this in my public speaking class. First, when normal people start registering, they’ll think their outreach is working and they’ll be delighted. Second, when they realize that people of different races and religions and orientations are joining, they’ll know that they weren’t racists all along. Then, when they finally realize that they’re outnumbered in their own party, they’ll go looking for a new home they can take over.

And Snow White and Seven Dwarfs were really real!

35 William Barnett-Lewis  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:44:21am

re: #25 allegro

I was born in Boston, grew up mostly in Chicago. Racism has never been limited to the south.

Milwaukee is often referred to as “the most segregated city in America” for good reason. And it still is. You had specific blocks for specific ethnicities and you didn’t dare live outside of them unless you were filthy rich and then you moved to Waukesha.

36 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:44:31am

re: #26 erik_t

This presumes there’s something in the Republican Party that’s worth saving. Consider me unconvinced.

It’s not the wingnuts who need the Republican Party. The country needs it. For better or worse, this system works with two parties. If one is disfunctional, then the whole government is disfunctional.

37 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:44:33am

re: #31 SteveMcG

I made a speech like this in my public speaking class. First, when normal people start registering, they’ll think their outreach is working and they’ll be delighted. Second, when they realize that people of different races and religions and orientations are joining, they’ll know that they weren’t racists all along. Then, when they finally realize that they’re outnumbered in their own party, they’ll go looking for a new home they can take over.

So the plan is to save the Republican Party by making it not be the Republican Party any more.

I’m not seeing the point.

38 lostlakehiker  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:45:03am

re: #5 Interesting Times

As long as enough tribalists in gerrymandered districts vote their way, they won’t. Too many American voters continue to reward their horrendous behavior.

The Republicans got spanked hard. The fact that republics have fared well over the centuries is evidence that somehow or other, spankings teach lessons.

A change of thinking on immigration is in the offing among Republicans, for instance. This, unlike some issues, is not a matter of principle for Republicans and is a topic on which, historically, they have led the charge for more open immigration in other eras.

39 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:45:39am

re: #32 b_sharp

Racists and idiots need to be marginalized, not in a federal governing party.

That’s the whole point. Taking away the control of the Republican Party from them.

40 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:46:25am

re: #36 SteveMcG

It’s not the wingnuts who need the Republican Party. The country needs it. For better or worse, this system works with two parties. If one is disfunctional, then the whole government is disfunctional.

Wave your wand; magic the current Republican party out of existence. What specific good things have been lost?

Split the Democrats in half later, if you would like.

41 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:46:52am

re: #39 SteveMcG

That’s the whole point. Taking away the control of the Republican Party from them.

You suggested driving them to the Dem party. Dems don’t need them any more than the Reps do.

42 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:48:04am

re: #41 b_sharp

You suggested driving them to the Dem party. Dems don’t need them any more than the Reps do.

Nor do we want them.

43 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:48:06am

re: #17 SteveMcG

I’m still registered Republican. It’s MY party and these assholes are crashing it. I’m not leaving. In fact, I urge EVERYBODY to join the Republican Party. The only why to disinfect the party is to get these clowns out in the primary process. Too many low information voters think guys like Chris Christie can straighten out the party. Problem with that is a Republican can’t do anything without the tea party caucus, and there are still too many reactionaries infesting the state legislatures. So we need to take this thing viral. Tell all your friends to register Republican. They can even run in primaries against incumbent wingnuts. As Christine O’Donnell and Sharon Engel showed, a primary is winnable, especially if you can get your friends to register with you. It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

The Confederate state Democrats, or Dixiecrats, voluntarily switched parties. Much to the betterment of the Democratic Party.

44 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:48:55am

re: #43 Gus

The Confederate state Democrats, or Dixiecrats, voluntarily switched parties. Much to the betterment of the Democratic Party.

Exhibit A, Strom Thurmond. And there are so many more.

45 Killgore Trout  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:48:57am

re: #36 SteveMcG

It’s not the wingnuts who need the Republican Party. The country needs it. For better or worse, this system works with two parties. If one is disfunctional, then the whole government is disfunctional.

Although I’m not a conservative or Republican, that’s why I think it’s important to at least acknowledge the existence of moderate Republicans instead of dismissing them as hopeless fools. A moderate GOP is not as far away as many would have us believe.

46 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:48:57am

re: #43 Gus

The Confederate state Democrats, or Dixiecrats, voluntarily switched parties. Much to the betterment of the Democratic Party.

NO TAKEBACKS.

47 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:50:05am

re: #44 HappyWarrior

Exhibit A, Strom Thurmond. And there are so many more.

Jesse Helms

48 mr.fusion  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:50:25am

re: #2 Pawn of the Oppressor

puts envelope against big purple sparkly hat
“Racist epithets and accusations of treason”.
tears open envelope, blows in it, extracts paper, reads
“What can you find in the comments underneath this story right now?”

From hotair:

All kidding aside, I think you’re right. Every racial group in this country has an interest group looking out for them. Whites, I belive, are targeted for replacement. Why shouldn’t there be a political party/interest group, that looks after the interest of whites. After all, Whites are people too.

antifederalist on January 13, 2013 at 12:11 PM

[…]

Colin Powell is a media prop. That’s it.

DaydreamBeliever on January 13, 2013 at 12:13 PM

[…]

Sounds like someone has become comfortable with being back on the plantation.

Flange on January 13, 2013 at 12:19 PM

[…]

Powell readily admits that he got ahead on affirmative action, and is proud of it enough to advocate more affirmative action.

melle1228 on January 13, 2013 at 12:40 PM

[…]

“If it’s just going to represent the far right-wing of the political spectrum, I think the party is in difficulty.”~~ Colon Bowel

Spoken like a true racist.

DanaSmiles on January 13, 2013 at 12:46 PM

[…]

Cornball patriot.

Ronnie on January 13, 2013 at 12:49 PM

[…]

Colon is the azzhole who used hue, abusing the political spectrum, to advance, any which way he could.

I’d prefer that he be a declared communist. What a creep he is, a man without a soul.

MLK died for nothing.

Schadenfreude on January 13, 2013 at 2:19 PM

49 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:50:35am

re: #37 erik_t

So the plan is to save the Republican Party by making it not be the Republican Party any more.

I’m not seeing the point.

People are more conservative than you think. I mean that in a good way. To be conservative is to respect the future. I think most people feel that way. Wingnuts they hate the present, and they refuse to face the fact that a future even exists. Even if you could debate how much oil is available, or the rate of climate change, or how long the US can afford to run deficits, the day of reckoning WILL come. Most people have enough integrity and personal responsibility to want us to address that future. I’m not trying to destroy the Republican Party, I want to restore it.

50 allegro  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:50:49am

re: #40 erik_t

Wave your wand; magic the current Republican party out of existence. What specific good things have been lost?

Split the Democrats in half later, if you would like.

This. I have seen nothing redeemable in the GOP for going on a couple of decades now and just continuing to get more irrational, extreme, and insane. Why anyone would think it could be reformed is beyond me. Why stay in such a party to try to change it rather than move to the only sane party remaining and try to change some of its policies you don’t like? The latter is a much more sensible approach.

51 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:51:58am

We have bigots in our party. They’re really Democrats.

No true Scotsman.

And a cop-out.

52 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:52:10am

re: #49 SteveMcG

People are more conservative than you think. I mean that in a good way. To be conservative is to respect the future.

At no point in my life has the Republican Party been conservative on any issue.

What, specifically, do you want to keep? Aside from the label?

53 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:52:20am

re: #45 Killgore Trout

Although I’m not a conservative or Republican, that’s why I think it’s important to at least acknowledge the existence of moderate Republicans instead of dismissing them as hopeless fools. A moderate GOP is not as far away as many would have us believe.

I think a moderate GOP is farther than you think. Without new blood the tea party wing is too dominant.

54 jaunte  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:52:42am

re: #48 mr.fusion

All kidding aside, I think you’re right. Every racial group in this country has an interest group looking out for them. Whites, I belive, are targeted for replacement. Why shouldn’t there be a political party/interest group, that looks after the interest of whites. After all, Whites are people too.

Join the Victim Party!

55 mr.fusion  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:53:51am

re: #30 Charles Johnson

I don’t know where this is going to end, but I don’t think the Republican Party will ever renounce the far right loons. It’s an integral part of their appeal to an ever-shrinking audience of reactionary throwbacks.

Maybe a third party will appear, but the odds against this are pretty long, too.

As far as I can see, the extremists have the GOP in a death grip.

The problem is they can’t win elections without them. The racists and loons are their base and it’s become so ingrained that it’s going to take a generation to flush these people out.

The racists, conspiracy theorists, preppers, and ignorant lunatics are the ones that make phone calls for candidates, knock on doors, and donate their money. Without them the Republicans will never win elections. They have to appeal to these people to win primaries and remain viable, but the way that they appeal to them is turning off the growing majority of Americans.

In short…..they’re screwed

56 Charles Johnson  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:54:03am

The Republican Party has just lost a second presidential election, and there are NO signs that it’s causing any “moderation” to appear. The noises they’re making about immigration are just that - noises. They’re not making sincere attempts to rethink an untenable position, they’re trying to find some way to better disguise their agenda, and improve the “messaging.” It’s BS.

When you have a GOP presidential slate that looked like the one we saw last year, I don’t see how anyone can argue otherwise. And the rage and hatred is just totally off the charts on right wing websites.

They’re not going to change. They’re getting worse.

57 bratwurst  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:54:13am

re: #48 mr.fusion

From hotair:

The thing that gets me is that you know EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THOSE PEOPLE venerated the name of General Powell literally up until the moment he went public with his endorsement of Obama in late October 2008.

58 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:55:00am

re: #52 erik_t

At no point in my life has the Republican Party been conservative on any issue.

What, specifically, do you want to keep? Aside from the label?

I don’t know how old you are, but creating the EPA was a conservative move. Obamacare was first created by Republicans (heh) in the 90s.

59 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:56:28am

re: #56 Charles Johnson

The Republican Party has just lost a second presidential election, and there are NO signs that it’s causing any “moderation” to appear. The noises they’re making about immigration are just that - noises. They’re not making sincere attempts to rethink an untenable position, they’re trying to find some way to better disguise their agenda, and improve the “messaging.” It’s BS.

They can’t rethink their policy positions, because to a large extent they weren’t thought in the first place. The party stands for the idea of standing for things. That’s what it’s built upon; that’s their measure of merit. Rigid orthodoxy and unwavering commitment.

60 allegro  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:56:48am

re: #58 SteveMcG

I don’t know how old you are, but creating the EPA was a conservative move. Obamacare was first created by Republicans (heh) in the 90s.

Exactly. So what is your problem with the Democratic party today since it seems to embody your belief system quite well?

61 mr.fusion  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:57:10am

re: #56 Charles Johnson

The Republican Party has just lost a second presidential election, and there are NO signs that it’s causing any “moderation” to appear. The noises they’re making about immigration are just that - noises. They’re not making sincere attempts to rethink an untenable position, they’re trying to find some way to better disguise their agenda, and improve the “messaging.” It’s BS.

When you have a GOP presidential slate that looked like the one we saw last year, I don’t see how anyone can argue otherwise. And the rage and hatred is just totally off the charts on right wing websites.

They’re not going to change. They’re getting worse.

1/9/13

Iowa’s Steve King is cracking down on immigrants’ “anchor babies.” King is yet again trying to “clarify” the portion of the 14th Amendment that protects birthright citizenship.

What’s missing in the lineup? Planned Parenthood. In 2011, then-Congressman Mike Pence of Indiana introduced a bill to strip funding from Planned Parenthood because the organization offers abortion services. Pence was comfortable saying that he would hold up the passage of a budget in order to make sure that Planned Parenthood lost federal funding.

Pence has left Congress and Planned Parenthood still receives federal funding. All the same, not one, but two members of Congress have reintroduced the bill to defund Planned Parenthood. On the “Mike Huckabee Show” earlier this week, Tennessee Rep. Marsha Blackburn defended her decision to bring back the bill, saying “Planned Parenthood is basically big abortion business.”

They have learned NOTHING

62 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:57:41am

re: #58 SteveMcG

I don’t know how old you are, but creating the EPA was a conservative move. Obamacare was first created by Republicans (heh) in the 90s.

Richard Nixon wouldn’t have made it as far in the primaries as Herman fucking Cain.

If you’re advocating a Republican Party circa 1970, that’s fine. More power to you. What in today’s GOP is worth saving?

63 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:57:52am

re: #58 SteveMcG

I don’t know how old you are, but creating the EPA was a conservative move. Obamacare was first created by Republicans (heh) in the 90s.

Senator Henry M. Jackson (D-WA) National Environmental Policy Act

64 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:57:55am

re: #59 erik_t

They can’t rethink their policy positions, because to a large extent they weren’t thought in the first place. The party stands for the idea of standing for things. That’s what it’s built upon; that’s their measure of merit. Rigid orthodoxy and unwavering commitment.

And an almost fanatical devotion to the pope…

///

65 jaunte  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:57:57am

The Eisenhower Republicans lost to the nutcases. That battle is over.

66 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:58:00am

I really see no signs of them moderating. Really, where are the new GOP moderates? It seems we lose more than we gain each election in public office. Although, I know I agree with Joe Donnelly more than I would Dick Lugar on most issues. Lugar losing his primary to Mourdock is a sign. Castle losing his primary to O’Donnell. Ken Cuccinnelli being a shoe in for the GOP nomination for governor here in Virginia. If you think a new moderate GOP is coming, I’d like to see real examples. Because I see nothing about that party at this present time that suggests they’re moderating. In fact, all evidence points to the contrary with how Chris Christie has become almost persona non grata in some Republican circles because he dared to speak nicely about President Obama.

67 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:58:09am

re: #60 allegro

Exactly. So what is your problem with the Democratic party today since it seems to embody your belief system quite well?

I don’t have a problem right now with the Democratic Party. What makes you think I do?

68 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:59:07am

re: #63 Gus

Senator Henry M. Jackson (D-WA) National Environmental Policy Act

Fair enough, but many people associate it with the Nixon Administration.

69 allegro  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:59:23am

re: #67 SteveMcG

I don’t have a problem right now with the Democratic Party. What makes you think I do?

Saying you’re still a Republican was a clue.

70 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:59:54am

re: #68 SteveMcG

Fair enough, but many people associate it with the Nixon Administration.

Well, he signed off on it. He was an old school Republican in many respects.

71 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:00:18pm

re: #58 SteveMcG

I don’t know how old you are, but creating the EPA was a conservative move. Obamacare was first created by Republicans (heh) in the 90s.

And what do today’s Republicans want to do with the EPA? Even Jon Huntsman. A man seen as a moderate Republican today wants to repeal it. And Obamacare. Yeah it was a Republican proposal in the 1990’s What did 2009’s Republicans do to it? Oh yes they opposed it and even today after the USSC has affirmed its constitutionality, you have Republican governors who want to skip around it. All you’re showing is how far to the right the Republican Party has moved in the last 40 years.

72 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:00:59pm

So the GOP is going to complain about the intolerance after they themselves just let the Tea Party in?

73 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:01:25pm

re: #58 SteveMcG

I don’t know how old you are, but creating the EPA was a conservative move. Obamacare was first created by Republicans (heh) in the 90s.

Actually to listen to the modern GOP, creating the EPA was a very “progressive” move, because its creation involved giving the government the power to regulate pollution and punish companies. And it should be remembered that the GOP proposal in the 90s was in response to “Hillarycare,” the health care reform proposals by the Clinton White House that would have been a much bigger step towards single-payer than Obamacare ever will be. The Heritage Foundation’s proposal was rooted in the same orthodoxy that the GOP still spews today: “market-based reform.”

74 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:02:23pm

re: #65 jaunte

The Eisenhower Republicans lost to the nutcases. That battle is over.

Over? Are we supposed to quit because it’s too hard to get the party back? We need a viable Republican Party. Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? (BTW, how long until some Animal House movie of the future has Bluto saying “Was it over when the Iraqis blew up 9/11?”)

75 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:03:01pm

For the most part the GOP is just the party of tax cuts for the rich, big Pentagon spending, abortion, and, Big Gay.

76 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:03:11pm

re: #69 allegro

Saying you’re still a Republican was a clue.

It’s a clue of nothing. Are Democrats supposed to hate Republicans, too?

77 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:03:29pm

We do need a viable Republican Party. That I agree with. The problem is they’re showing no signs whatsoever of moderating. That’s up to them ultimately in the end and not me. It’s not my job as a liberal to save the Republicans from their own trip to lunacy.

78 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:03:33pm

re: #74 SteveMcG

Over? Are we supposed to quit because it’s too hard to get the party back? We need a viable Republican Party. Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? (BTW, how long until some Animal House movie of the future has Bluto saying “Was it over when the Iraqis blew up 9/11?”)

We need a viable second party. Split the Democrats if you like, or start a new party. I ask you for a third time: what’s worth saving in the current Republican party?

79 Killgore Trout  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:05:12pm

re: #53 SteveMcG

I think a moderate GOP is farther than you think. Without new blood the tea party wing is too dominant.

I agree that the next election cycle is still too soon. I think within the next 8-10 years Republicans will have to reform. Insider Republican strategists know that Powel is right. I suspect they decided to let the Tea Party thing play out for various reasons. The influx of money to the Tea party from PACs, and the influence of Fox News (and Glenn Beck) left the Republican base in a position where they simply would not tolerate moderate or practical leadership. It’s going to take a while for that influence to evaporate.

80 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:05:36pm

re: #72 Gus

So the GOP is going to complain about the intolerance after they themselves just let the Tea Party in?

That’s why I say the party is farther from moderation than you think. The party needs new blood. Just because you register doesn’t mean you have to vote for guys like Pat Toomey. But you can’t vote against him, or for a saner candidtate, in a PA primary if you’re not registered.

81 Jimmah  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:06:20pm

re: #17 SteveMcG

I’m still registered Republican. It’s MY party and these assholes are crashing it. I’m not leaving. In fact, I urge EVERYBODY to join the Republican Party. The only why to disinfect the party is to get these clowns out in the primary process. Too many low information voters think guys like Chris Christie can straighten out the party. Problem with that is a Republican can’t do anything without the tea party caucus, and there are still too many reactionaries infesting the state legislatures. So we need to take this thing viral. Tell all your friends to register Republican. They can even run in primaries against incumbent wingnuts. As Christine O’Donnell and Sharon Engel showed, a primary is winnable, especially if you can get your friends to register with you.

Sorry, but it’s not our job to somehow save the GOP’s ass from the consequences of its own stupidity and ignorance.

It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

Yeah right. That’s where racism and idiocy came from - the Democratic Party.

82 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:07:50pm

re: #77 HappyWarrior

We do need a viable Republican Party. That I agree with. The problem is they’re showing no signs whatsoever of moderating. That’s up to them ultimately in the end and not me. It’s not my job as a liberal to save the Republicans from their own trip to lunacy.

re: #36 SteveMcG

It’s not the wingnuts who need the Republican Party. The country needs it. For better or worse, this system works with two parties. If one is disfunctional, then the whole government is disfunctional.

re: #39 SteveMcG

That’s the whole point. Taking away the control of the Republican Party from them.

83 William Barnett-Lewis  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:08:04pm

re: #74 SteveMcG

Over? Are we supposed to quit because it’s too hard to get the party back? We need a viable Republican Party. Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? (BTW, how long until some Animal House movie of the future has Bluto saying “Was it over when the Iraqis blew up 9/11?”)

No. What is going to happen is that the Republican party will implode in the wake of the 2014 & 2016 elections. At that point, the moderates will get together and create a new party the same way that Anti-Slavery Radicals created the Republican party after the Whigs imploded over the slavery issue. The Teabaggers will also create their own little nationalist/fascist party that, I pray, will go nowhere.

84 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:08:41pm

re: #80 SteveMcG

That’s why I say the party is farther from moderation than you think. The party needs new blood. Just because you register doesn’t mean you have to vote for guys like Pat Toomey. But you can’t vote against him, or for a saner candidtate, in a PA primary if you’re not registered.

I don’t see it happening anytime soon. After ‘12 I’m seeing no change. A good example of this is the recent legislation introduced in the House. Their obsession with all things gay, abortion, contraception, etc. Look at the recent assignments to the “science” committees.

85 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:08:45pm

re: #80 SteveMcG

That’s why I say the party is farther from moderation than you think. The party needs new blood. Just because you register doesn’t mean you have to vote for guys like Pat Toomey. But you can’t vote against him, or for a saner candidtate, in a PA primary if you’re not registered.

And then what when he loses and the nominee is an Akin or Angle or a O’Donnell? Refuse to vote or vote third party? What exactly is participating in the whole deal accomplishing at this point besides lending an air of legitimacy?

86 Obdicut  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:09:02pm

re: #45 Killgore Trout

Although I’m not a conservative or Republican, that’s why I think it’s important to at least acknowledge the existence of moderate Republicans instead of dismissing them as hopeless fools. A moderate GOP is not as far away as many would have us believe.

The trend in the GOP over the past eight years has been constantly towards extremism, both in who gets elected and what policy positions they hold. You also thought Mitt Romney was going to bring the GOP back to the center.

87 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:09:16pm

re: #82 SteveMcG

Sorry, that was supposed to be a reply to

#78re: #78 erik_t

We need a viable second party. Split the Democrats if you like, or start a new party. I ask you for a third time: what’s worth saving in the current Republican party?

88 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:09:37pm

VAWA

89 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:09:44pm

re: #85 Targetpractice

And then what when he loses and the nominee is an Akin or Angle or a O’Donnell? Refuse to vote or vote third party? What exactly is participating in the whole deal accomplishing at this point besides lending an air of legitimacy?

Then vote for the Democrat in November. Is this really that complicated?

90 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:10:18pm

Spastic tubes.

91 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:11:06pm

re: #89 SteveMcG

Vote for the Democrat. Is this that complicated?

Yes, it actually rather is. I should point out that the idea of “reform from within” is what the Tea Party has said is its goal as well.

92 Jimmah  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:11:15pm

re: #88 Gus

VAWA

Iceweasel says

You can know all you need to know about the modern Republican party by checking out their attitudes towards VAWA.

PS She also says Hi!

93 Charles Johnson  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:11:28pm

re: #90 Gus

Spastic tubes.

Indeed.

94 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:12:15pm

re: #92 Jimmah

Iceweasel says

You can know all you need to know about the modern Republican party by checking out their attitudes towards VAWA.

PS She also says Hi!

Hi Jim! Hi Ice! ;)

95 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:13:00pm

Small ‘c’ conservatism is an emotional response that we can all experience under stress. It’s a mindset that values security, stability, closure, rejects risk and tends to gather family closer while pushing others away.

The Tea Party is trying to validate their insecurity by looking back to an imaginary time where personal security was assured. It was a time before progressives ruined it with equal rights, psychology, empathy and the ‘entitlement’ culture.

96 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:13:38pm

re: #95 b_sharp

Small ‘c’ conservatism is an emotional response that we can all experience under stress. It’s a mindset that values security, stability, closure, rejects risk and tends to gather family closer while pushing others away.

The Tea Party is trying to validate their insecurity by looking back to an imaginary time where personal security was assured. It was a time before progressives ruined it with equal rights, psychology, empathy and the ‘entitlement’ culture.

Well said.

97 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:14:45pm
98 allegro  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:14:54pm

re: #76 SteveMcG

It’s a clue of nothing. Are Democrats supposed to hate Republicans, too?

At what point did I suggest that you hated Democrats? You have told us in your own words that you remain a Republican despite the facts that it doesn’t represent you at all any more. The Democratic party does represent everything you’ve claimed to want here. As someone asked you earlier, are you just attached to the word “Republican”? Otherwise, what you’re hanging on to makes little sense.

99 kirkspencer  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:15:09pm

Look, folks, I hate to point this out but the Republican party has been the party of the aristocrats for its entire existence. Throughout that time they’ve incorporated other elements because neither money nor purity of heart makes a person’s vote count for more than that of anyone else.

This does not make them bad, any more than the Democratic history of being the populist party makes them always good. It is, however, reality.

Part of the GOP’s present problem is its schizophrenia, caused by the consequences of the aristocrats encouraging part of the populist (though exclusionary) to merge.

At the same time the Democrats have a problem as well, though it’s neither as severe nor as obvious at this time. That’s the fact they’ve let aristocrats of their own develop. They crushed their populists back in the 1960s, and the lack has made them vulnerable to the Republican’s coopted forces in a number of ways.

We have these multitudes of oppositional elements, and they have to split between two parties due to some errors in our governmental structure. The consequence is that both sides consist of uneasy partnerships, each member of which is trying to not only defeat the other ‘side’ but to dominate the partnership to which they belong. Right now the GOP is the most obvious - but it’s foolish to think they’re going to become what they used to be OR that the Democrats are immune to following the same path in the future.

100 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:15:32pm

re: #91 Targetpractice

Yes, it actually rather is. I should point out that the idea of “reform from within” is what the Tea Party has said is its goal as well.

I think the tea party has maxed out. Now they can take advantage of the fact that the Republican Party will start shrinking as older members die off, normal people bail and younger people don’t replace them. That actually gives them more power, when you think of the weak media and low information voters

101 iceweasel  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:18:47pm

HAI GUYZ!

I HAVE A GREAT IDEA! LET’S ALL SEND A MESSAGE ABOUT OUR UNHAPPINESS WITH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY BY…….REGISTERING REPUBLICAN!

THAT’LL SHOW ‘EM!

102 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:19:29pm

re: #100 SteveMcG

I think the tea party has maxed out. Now they can take advantage of the fact that the Republican Party will start shrinking as older members die off, normal people bail and younger people don’t replace them. That actually gives them more power, when you think of the weak media and low information voters

Sorry, but in the long run I think the exact opposite has happened. I think the gerrymandering of ‘10 has ensured that the Tea Party will remain a spoiler for elections yet to come. They may not get candidates elected, they may not directly influence policy, but so long as they’re there to demand “purity” in party primaries, the party still has to deal with them.

In some ways, I thank the GOP for creating so many “safe” districts in ‘10. In the long run, they’ve assured that the party will only continue to wallow in its own insanity instead of consider moderation, if only to keep the loons at bay.

103 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:19:50pm

Jerry Falwell
Pat Robertson
Liberty University
American Family Association
Family Research Council
Tony Perkins
Phyllis Schlafly…

104 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:20:15pm

re: #98 allegro

At what point did I suggest that you hated Democrats? You have told us in your own words that you remain a Republican despite the facts that it doesn’t represent you at all any more. The Democratic party does represent everything you’ve claimed to want here. As someone asked you earlier, are you just attached to the word “Republican”? Otherwise, what you’re hanging on to makes little sense.

Yeah, so hate wasn’t the right word. I was rushing to keep up with the conversation. So at waht point did I suggest I have a problem with the Democratic Party? (Better?) Just because I’m a republican doesn’t mean I reject what the Democratic Party stands for. The fact that the Democratic Party shares some of my values is coincidental, and I think temporary. We haven’t always coincided. However, I think conservatism has a role in government and society, and is has been usurped by the wingnuts.

105 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:20:45pm

You lie!

Then make t-shirts.

106 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:21:43pm

re: #101 iceweasel

HAI GUYZ!

I HAVE A GREAT IDEA! LET’S ALL SEND A MESSAGE ABOUT OUR UNHAPPINESS WITH THE REPUBLICAN PARTY BY…….REGISTERING REPUBLICAN!

THAT’LL SHOW ‘EM!

Or bring the Democratic Party back in line with the principles of Jefferson Davis. //

107 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:21:59pm

re: #102 Targetpractice

Sorry, but in the long run I think the exact opposite has happened. I think the gerrymandering of ‘10 has ensured that the Tea Party will remain a spoiler for elections yet to come. They may not get candidates elected, they may not directly influence policy, but so long as they’re there to demand “purity” in party primaries, the party still has to deal with them.

In some ways, I thank the GOP for creating so many “safe” districts in ‘10. In the long run, they’ve assured that the party will only continue to wallow in its own insanity instead of consider moderation, if only to keep the loons at bay.

This is EXACTLY why the Republican Party needs new blood, and it is also EXACTLY why we need a viable Republican party. As long as the wingnuts have a political party under their control, this is the new normal for years to come.

108 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:22:07pm

re: #103 Gus

Jerry Falwell
Pat Robertson
Liberty University
American Family Association
Family Research Council
Tony Perkins
Phyllis Schlafly…

Are you trying to make me gag?

109 Killgore Trout  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:22:42pm

re: #99 kirkspencer

The consequence is that both sides consist of uneasy partnerships, each member of which is trying to not only defeat the other ‘side’ but to dominate the partnership to which they belong. Right now the GOP is the most obvious - but it’s foolish to think they’re going to become what they used to be OR that the Democrats are immune to following the same path in the future.

Which is exactly why I want to see a viable and realistic Republican party. As a moderate I want to have that option when one party goes off the rails. There are always elements trying to pull the parties further to the extremes. It can happen.

110 allegro  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:23:03pm

re: #104 SteveMcG

Yeah, so hate wasn’t the right word. I was rushing to keep up with the conversation. So at waht point did I suggest I have a problem with the Democratic Party? (Better?) Just because I’m a republican doesn’t mean I reject what the Democratic Party stands for. The fact that the Democratic Party shares some of my values is coincidental, and I think temporary. We haven’t always coincided. However, I think conservatism has a role in government and society, and is has been usurped by the wingnuts.

Apparently you’ve missed that the Democratic party today IS a conservative party by at least any international definition of the term. What we don’t have in this country is a liberal party.

111 kirkspencer  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:23:12pm

re: #102 Targetpractice

Sorry, but in the long run I think the exact opposite has happened. I think the gerrymandering of ‘10 has ensured that the Tea Party will remain a spoiler for elections yet to come. They may not get candidates elected, they may not directly influence policy, but so long as they’re there to demand “purity” in party primaries, the party still has to deal with them.

In some ways, I thank the GOP for creating so many “safe” districts in ‘10. In the long run, they’ve assured that the party will only continue to wallow in its own insanity instead of consider moderation, if only to keep the loons at bay.

While I generally agree (hence the upding) there is the fact that they may get hoist by their success. The problem with the gerrymandering is that they may get primaried from the right. As a result the moderate D (who might be an R in all but name) might start looking pretty good to the majority.

112 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:23:37pm

re: #108 b_sharp

Are you trying to make me gag?

Super gag list here.

113 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:23:47pm

We should have saved the Know-Nothings from themselves.

/

114 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:24:34pm

Okay so hypothetically a bunch of re-register with the Republican Party? Then what. So we can vote in Republican primaries now for the least insane candidate. Great. That’s one small step. For better or worse, the wingnuts got the influence they have through their own hard work. As I said earlier, I do want the Republican Party to be viable but it’s going to take conservatives and even moderates rather than liberals like me to save the Republican Party from its own idiocy. They’re not going to listen to the newcomer who is more liberal than he is conservative.

115 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:24:36pm

re: #103 Gus

Jerry Falwell
Pat Robertson
Liberty University
American Family Association
Family Research Council
Tony Perkins
Phyllis Schlafly…

All inhabitants of the lunatic fringe, but all have far more power than they should because of the cowardice of what used to be the Republican Party.

116 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:25:25pm

re: #113 erik_t

We should have saved the Know-Nothings from themselves.

/

Whiskey would have done that. Once you go Jameson, you don’t go back.

117 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:25:41pm

re: #112 Gus

Super gag list here.

I should have downdinged you for making me look.

What a list of evil.

118 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:26:02pm
119 Vicious Babushka  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:26:24pm
120 TedStriker  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:26:33pm

re: #17 SteveMcG

I’m still registered Republican. It’s MY party and these assholes are crashing it. I’m not leaving. In fact, I urge EVERYBODY to join the Republican Party. The only why to disinfect the party is to get these clowns out in the primary process. Too many low information voters think guys like Chris Christie can straighten out the party. Problem with that is a Republican can’t do anything without the tea party caucus, and there are still too many reactionaries infesting the state legislatures. So we need to take this thing viral. Tell all your friends to register Republican. They can even run in primaries against incumbent wingnuts. As Christine O’Donnell and Sharon Engel showed, a primary is winnable, especially if you can get your friends to register with you. It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

I was pretty much with you IRT trying to overwhelm the crazies and racists in the GOP, until your last sentence. For that, you can just STFD and STFU, because the nuts, racists, and bigots should have no place in any mainstream political party.

121 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:27:45pm

re: #118 Gus

Bachmann, Blunt and Cantor Listed as Special Guests at Religious Right Inauguration Event

Change! Republican style.

The keynote speaker will be Messianic Rabbi Jonathan Cahn, who believes that the Bible prophesied the September 11, 2001 attacks, the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers and America’s imminent destruction due to “tolerance for immorality,” teaching “sexual immorality in public schools,” abortion rights and Obama. Cahn believes that America is experiencing divine punishment and has shared his message with right-wing broadcasters like Robertson, Glenn Beck, Sid Roth, Jan Markell and Jim Bakker. Farah even made a movie about Cahn’s book.

122 blueraven  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:27:52pm

The teaparty is the republican party. Please.
The branding of this as something new is just marketing.

This is the result of the republican’s shift to the hard right since the 80s. The evangelical, anti-immigration, anti-science, anti-education, anti-equality party is alive and well with the blessing of it’s leaders.

123 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:28:11pm

re: #121 Gus

Lovely.

124 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:28:31pm

re: #114 HappyWarrior

Okay so hypothetically a bunch of re-register with the Republican Party? Then what. So we can vote in Republican primaries now for the least insane candidate. Great. That’s one small step. For better or worse, the wingnuts got the influence they have through their own hard work. As I said earlier, I do want the Republican Party to be viable but it’s going to take conservatives and even moderates rather than liberals like me to save the Republican Party from its own idiocy. They’re not going to listen to the newcomer who is more liberal than he is conservative.

No. You can run a normal candidate, and vote for him or her in the primary. As Allegro said, we don’t have a liberal party. Why is that? I think it’s because a lot of moderate conservatives have no where else to go. You can always switch back someday, and you can still vote Democratic in November.

125 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:28:59pm

I chuckled at Ojoe’s New Whig silliness as much as the next guy, but to his credit at least he recognized there wasn’t anything worth saving in the GOP. Better than this wishy-washy nonsense.

126 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:29:15pm

re: #123 HappyWarrior

Lovely.

We’re still on the road to peak wingnut and the GOP is at the wheel.

127 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:29:32pm
why does he still consider himself a Republican? Because I can guarantee that most Republicans don’t see him that way; they see him as a traitor.

As I run off to get breakfast, I had to pop in to say that this reminds me of the response to Chris Christie.

There’s a claim that Christie is currently the most popular politician in the country. Yet go to any Republican blog and they hate him.

Clearly his popularity is a response to him being the only high profile Republican to buck the trend and act like an adult, to care about his people and job and not hate the President too much to do it.

And notice the house response to that, to punish New Jersey, to punish ALL of New Jersey in a fashion that looks totally treasonous.

How did the Republican party get to be a party of emotionally ill bastards?

128 iceweasel  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:30:14pm

re: #104 SteveMcG

Yeah, so hate wasn’t the right word. I was rushing to keep up with the conversation. So at waht point did I suggest I have a problem with the Democratic Party? (Better?)

Quote: It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

Just because I’m a republican doesn’t mean I reject what the Democratic Party stands for.

It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.
Yeah, right. Tell me the story again, the one where joining the Republican party is the best way of objecting to that party! I love that story, but you never like telling me the end— the one where we get a black president.

129 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:30:25pm

re: #120 TedStriker

I was pretty much with you IRT trying to overwhelm the crazies and racists in the GOP, until your last sentence. For that, you can just STFD and STFU, because the nuts, racists, and bigots should have no place in any mainstream political party.

That last sentence, “It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.” was really just intended to provide a little historical (hysterical) context.

130 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:30:39pm

re: #107 SteveMcG

This is EXACTLY why the Republican Party needs new blood, and it is also EXACTLY why we need a viable Republican party. As long as the wingnuts have a political party under their control, this is the new normal for years to come.

Steve, guys like Ryan, Jindal, and Cruz ARE the party’s “new blood.” They’re the guys who are just crazy enough to get the loon vote, but non-threatening enough that moderates have a hard time running against them.

131 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:31:31pm

re: #129 SteveMcG

That last sentence, “It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.” was really just intended to provide a little historical (hysterical) context.

Yeah. Well, then provide more historical context. Our founding fathers owned people.

132 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:31:57pm

re: #126 Gus

We’re still on the road to peak wingnut and the GOP is at the wheel.

Time to deploy the road spikes.

133 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:31:57pm

re: #127 stabby

As I run off to get breakfast, I had to pop in to say that this reminds me of the response to Chris Christie.

There’s a claim that Christie is currently the most popular politician in the country. Yet go to any Republican blog and they hate him.

Clearly his popularity is a response to him being the only high profile Republican to buck the trend and act like an adult, to care about his people and job and not hate the President too much to do it.

And notice the house response to that, to punish New Jersey, to punish ALL of New Jersey in a fashion that looks totally treasonous.

How did the Republican party get to be a party of emotionally ill bastards?

Three words: Ronald Wilson Reagan.

134 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:32:20pm

re: #124 SteveMcG

No. You can run a normal candidate, and vote for him or her in the primary. As Allegro said, we don’t have a liberal party. Why is that? I think it’s because a lot of moderate conservatives have no where else to go. You can always switch back someday, and you can still vote Democratic in November.

Run a normal candidate? Do you realize how expensive running a campaign is? And I think you forget that if you vote in one party’s primary then you can’t vote in the other. As I said, as a liberal, it’s not my job to save the Republican Party from its own self induced trip to loonyville. The Republican Party if it returns to sanity will be saved by people within the party who want to see it do that rather than an outsider like me.

135 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:32:32pm

re: #130 Targetpractice

Steve, guys like Ryan, Jindal, and Cruz ARE the party’s “new blood.” They’re the guys who are just crazy enough to get the loon vote, but non-threatening enough that moderates have a hard time running against them.

Not buying that they’re new blood. They’re just trying to manipulate the lame media and low information voters. When push comes to shove, you’ll see them mocking science and doing the same shit Romney did.

136 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:33:13pm

re: #128 iceweasel

Quote:

What happened?

137 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:33:19pm

re: #135 SteveMcG

Not buying that they’re new blood. They’re just trying to manipulate the lame media and low information voters. When push comes to shove, you’ll see them mocking science and doing the same shit Romney did.

And the base loves them for it. I don’t think you yet realize that you and other “moderates” are not the party base anymore. You’re now the fringe.

138 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:33:19pm

re: #130 Targetpractice

Steve, guys like Ryan, Jindal, and Cruz ARE the party’s “new blood.” They’re the guys who are just crazy enough to get the loon vote, but non-threatening enough that moderates have a hard time running against them.

This.

139 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:33:36pm

re: #133 Targetpractice

I lived through him (ok I was in high school).

I didn’t like him, but he didn’t seem this crazy, this intolerant.

Hell, he used to be a Democrat and, frankly, his policies would too too far left for the current Republican party.

How is he responsible?

140 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:33:58pm

re: #138 HappyWarrior

This.

But, but, they’ll get better. Just you wait and see. //

141 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:34:03pm

re: #129 SteveMcG

That last sentence, “It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.” was really just intended to provide a little historical (hysterical) context.

It sounded like more than that. It sounded like a somewhat vituperative desire.

142 Jimmah  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:34:50pm

re: #136 SteveMcG

What happened?

refresh the page

143 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:34:58pm

re: #137 Targetpractice

And the base loves them for it. I don’t think you yet realize that you and other “moderates” are not the party base anymore. You’re now the fringe.

I know that, that’s why I’m asking for your help. Geez

144 Iwouldprefernotto  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:35:02pm

re: #138 HappyWarrior

This.

Paul Ryan is introducing another waste of time personhood bill. Yeah, they want to change.

145 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:35:15pm

re: #136 SteveMcG

What happened?

Gremlins.

146 TedStriker  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:35:36pm

re: #55 mr.fusion

The problem is they can’t win elections without them. The racists and loons are their base and it’s become so ingrained that it’s going to take a generation to flush these people out.

The racists, conspiracy theorists, preppers, and ignorant lunatics are the ones that make phone calls for candidates, knock on doors, and donate their money. Without them the Republicans will never win elections. They have to appeal to these people to win primaries and remain viable, but the way that they appeal to them is turning off the growing majority of Americans.

In short…..they’re screwed

They’re also in the media, preaching to the choir to shore up GOP support amongst their fellow reprobates and trying to prey on the lame and uninformed to bolster their ranks.

Murdoch, Beck, Savage, Hannity, Rush and other RWNJ media moguls and hacks aren’t going to go gently into that good night.

147 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:35:38pm

I mean these days you could be called a radical white-hating communist for quoting George H W Bush (that’s what the vetting said), or, no doubt, for quoting Ronald Reagan’s more liberal sentiments.

148 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:36:34pm

As Targetpractice has already illustrated, the moderates are no longer the base. They are the fringe. I mean look at this way. Look at how Herman Cain, a guy who had never been elected anywhere yet held strongly conservative positions polled compared with Jon Huntsman, a two term governor who could be called moderately conservative. The base is the problem. They have no desire to change. And it needs repeating, it’s not my or anyone here on the left’s responsibility for the Republican Party to change itself. I don’t know what needs to happen for them to realize they’ve gone off the deep end because losing two elections in a row hasn’t helped nor have the changing demographics.

149 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:37:15pm

re: #144 Iwouldprefernotto

Paul Ryan is introducing another waste of time personhood bill. Yeah, they want to change.

Ryan’s a fraud.

150 darthstar  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:37:31pm

It’s good to see Seattle decided to show up for the second half. Go Seahawks!

151 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:37:43pm

re: #128 iceweasel

Quote: It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.


That was just the closing line from my speech. It was supposed to be a zinger. The class got it.

152 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:38:14pm

re: #148 HappyWarrior

it’s not my or anyone here on the left’s responsibility for the Republican Party to change itself.

That phrase is reminding me of conversations about Islamists.

153 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:38:34pm

re: #150 darthstar

It’s good to see Seattle decided to show up for the second half. Go Seahawks!

I’m hoping the raptors win.

154 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:38:38pm

re: #142 Jimmah

refresh the page

Thanks

155 TedStriker  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:38:49pm

re: #125 erik_t

I chuckled at Ojoe’s New Whig silliness as much as the next guy, but to his credit at least he recognized there wasn’t anything worth saving in the GOP. Better than this wishy-washy nonsense.

Ojoe, AFAIK, still wound up sounding like a full-on RWNJ to me the closer we got to Election Day this time around.

Or was I taking him wrong?

156 Jimmah  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:39:40pm

Daddy says we won’t see Mitt Romney anymore…but he won’t say why.

157 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:40:06pm

re: #144 Iwouldprefernotto

Paul Ryan is introducing another waste of time personhood bill. Yeah, they want to change.

Science: hate it
Immigrants: fuck ‘em
Environment: God won’t let us do any real harm
Embryos: more important than children
Guns: more important than embryos
Poor people: shouldn’t be so lazy
Rich people: must fellate the job creators
Education: liberal plot
Defense: can’t spend enough
Deficits: don’t matter

There’s so much here worth saving from the Teahadists, said no thinking person ever.

158 TedStriker  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:40:16pm

re: #127 stabby

As I run off to get breakfast, I had to pop in to say that this reminds me of the response to Chris Christie.

There’s a claim that Christie is currently the most popular politician in the country. Yet go to any Republican blog and they hate him.

Clearly his popularity is a response to him being the only high profile Republican to buck the trend and act like an adult, to care about his people and job and not hate the President too much to do it.

And notice the house response to that, to punish New Jersey, to punish ALL of New Jersey in a fashion that looks totally treasonous.

How did the Republican party get to be a party of emotionally ill bastards?

Avarice, unchecked desire, and being power-drunk can do that to the weak of character.

159 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:40:24pm

re: #155 TedStriker

Ojoe, AFAIK, still wound up sounding like a full-on RWNJ to me the closer we got to Election Day this time around.

Or was I taking him wrong?

He got weird with the strange attacks on Obama’s manhood.

160 TedStriker  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:40:28pm

re: #129 SteveMcG

That last sentence, “It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.” was really just intended to provide a little historical (hysterical) context.

Uh-huh…

161 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:40:51pm

re: #139 stabby

I lived through him (ok I was in high school).

I didn’t like him, but he didn’t seem this crazy, this intolerant.

Hell, he used to be a Democrat and, frankly, his policies would too too far left for the current Republican party.

How is he responsible.

Ron welcomed the religion fruitloops and the nationalist nutbars into the party tent, promised them all sorts of goodies, so as to ensure electoral victory. Remember “Moral Majority”?

162 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:41:55pm

re: #157 erik_t

Science: hate it
Immigrants: fuck ‘em
Environment: God won’t let us do any real harm
Embryos: more important than children
Guns: more important than embryos
Poor people: shouldn’t be so lazy
Rich people: must fellate the job creators
Education: liberal plot
Defense: can’t spend enough
Deficits: don’t matter

There’s so much here worth saving from the Teahadists, said no thinking person ever.

Muslims. Repeat.

163 darthstar  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:42:08pm

re: #153 b_sharp

I’m hoping the raptors win.

Either way, they will.

164 Gus  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:42:22pm

Sharia law and terrorist babies. And BMWs.

165 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:42:24pm

re: #143 SteveMcG

I know that, that’s why I’m asking for your help. Geez

At this point, the only “help” the GOP needs is of the psychiatric variety. There is no way in Hell a single dollar from my pocket will ever go to the GOP again.

166 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:42:48pm

re: #161 Targetpractice

Ron welcomed the religion fruitloops and the nationalist nutbars into the party tent, promised them all sorts of goodies, so as to ensure electoral victory. Remember “Moral Majority”?

I think opening the campaign in Philadelphia, Mississippi talking about states rights where three civil rights workers were kidnapped and later murdered deserves mention too. I don’t think Reagan was a bigot from what I know about him personally but I do think he exploited people’s bigotries which is what I mean when I say Reagan perfected the Southern Strategy.

167 darthstar  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:42:50pm

And in the next game, two teams with names associated with teabaggers.

168 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:43:02pm

re: #158 TedStriker

I guess I should add “weak character” as one of the common results of extreme religious belief, along with poisonous resentment, greed and intolerance.

169 erik_t  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:43:31pm

re: #162 Gus

Muslims. Repeat.

I’m charitably granting that the furiously boiling racism is not one of the professions of the GOP.

170 HoosierHoops  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:43:48pm

re: #150 darthstar

It’s good to see Seattle decided to show up for the second half. Go Seahawks!

Wasn’t it Grantland Rice that said, ’ Are my eyes seeing what I think they are seeing?’

171 iceweasel  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:45:43pm

re: #161 Targetpractice

Ron welcomed the religion fruitloops and the nationalist nutbars into the party tent, promised them all sorts of goodies, so as to ensure electoral victory. Remember “Moral Majority”?

The Moral Majority is neither.

^Sticker I saw on a Planned Parenthood bathroom mirror in the 80’s.

172 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:45:57pm

re: #169 erik_t

I’m not sure what he meant by “muslims. repeat.” but you do have to notice Gingritch and religious nuts in the party declaring war on Islam…

It’s like they called up Al Qaeda and asked “what could we do that would help your cause the most?”

173 Vicious Babushka  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:48:03pm

re: #121 Gus

The keynote speaker will be Messianic Rabbi Jonathan Cahn

Jonathan Cahn is an Evangelical Christian. Because he is a converted Jew does not give him the right to call himself a “rabbi”

174 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:48:24pm

re: #165 Targetpractice

At this point, the only “help” the GOP needs is of the psychiatric variety. There is no way in Hell a single dollar from my pocket will ever go to the GOP again.

Did I say anything about dollars? I’m talking about primaries. If “non-conforming” republicans can get primaried from the right, why can’t wingnuts get primaried from the left? But they usually can’t get primaried from the left because moderate voters aren’t really motivated to vote in primaries. That’s where we come in. You can go on feeling all kinds of superior to these teahadists (and I totally agree), but as long as the Republican Party has their 40 seat stranglehold (h/t Stephen Colbert) on the Senate and such extensive power in the state legislatures, you’re going to have to endure the tea party.

175 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:49:19pm

By the way, while they were denouncing Obama’s CIA pick for refusing to denounce Islam, I pointed out on PJ that declaring Islam itself to be the enemy would be to immeasurably hurt the war against the extremists and put our people in more danger.

I made the argument forcefully so as usual lately, I got no answer.

There’s a surprising number of topics that they’re so weak on these days that they can’t face any criticism.

176 Killgore Trout  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:50:12pm

re: #164 Gus

Sharia law and terrorist babies. And BMWs.

They also believe there are no moderate Muslims.

177 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:51:39pm

re: #176 Killgore Trout

There are no moderate Republicans!

Show me one!

Chris Christie isn’t a real Republican or he’s practicing takiyah!

178 b_sharp  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:52:06pm

re: #168 stabby

I guess I should add “weak character” as one of the common results of extreme religious belief, along with poisonous resentment, greed and intolerance.

I disagree with you in all aspects.

Does the religion produce the personality, the personality produce the religion or a combination?

179 Jimmah  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:53:04pm

re: #151 SteveMcG

That was just the closing line from my speech. It was supposed to be a zinger. The class got it.

Judging by the responses, what the class got is that you are talking bollocks.

180 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:54:02pm

re: #174 SteveMcG

Did I say anything about dollars? I’m talking about primaries. If “non-conforming” republicans can get primaried from the right, why can’t wingnuts get primaried from the left? But they usually can’t get primaried from the left because moderate voters aren’t really motivated to vote in primaries. That’s where we come in. You can go on feeling all kinds of superior to these teahadists (and I totally agree), but as long as the Republican Party has their 40 seat stranglehold (h/t Stephen Colbert) on the Senate and such extensive power in the state legislatures, you’re going to have to endure the tea party.

When the crazies have groups like Club for Growth and Heritage bankrolling them to the tune of millions for media advertising, who’s supporting the moderate? Certainly not liberal groups, they’re saving their money for the general election itself.

181 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:54:47pm

re: #179 Jimmah

Judging by the responses, what the class got is that you are talking bollocks.

Actually a dozen of my classmates sent in the voter registration forms I brought in.

182 Jimmah  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:57:58pm

“It happened to a wingnut”

183 HappyWarrior  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:58:34pm

re: #180 Targetpractice

When the crazies have groups like Club for Growth and Heritage bankrolling them to the tune of millions for media advertising, who’s supporting the moderate? Certainly not liberal groups, they’re saving their money for the general election itself.

Exactly. And here’s another question. Who is this moderate? We get guys like Akin, etc because they make their reputation first on a more local/state level where they gain a reputation for being firebrands for their respective causes. And what Steve is also ignoring is that we forfeit our right to influence the Democratic Party by voting in the Republican Primary. In a way doing that makes the Republican fringe strengthen because that’s how you end up nominating someone like Alvin Greene to run against Jim DeMint. I want to see a moderate GOP. I do. But they need to solve that problem more on their own. They need to look at themselves rather than have me look at them.

184 SteveMcG  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 12:58:53pm

re: #180 Targetpractice

When the crazies have groups like Club for Growth and Heritage bankrolling them to the tune of millions for media advertising, who’s supporting the moderate? Certainly not liberal groups, they’re saving their money for the general election itself.

“I guess it’s just too hard, so I won’t even try.”

185 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 1:02:30pm

re: #178 b_sharp

I think the religion comes first. It:
1) gives people a model of the world that matches nothing that happens, and the constant cognitive dissonance causes resentment
2) it gives people a moralistic mental model of other minds that doesn’t work either, for result, see above
3) fear of coming to heretical conclusions blocks the ability to learn to reason as opposed to rationalize. And the need to protect oneself from social pressure toward heresy makes hatred necessary
4) internal demonization of sexual needs leads to misery, to resentment, and to projection - which also leads to intolerance.
5) the failed model of the mind along with the need to justify the supreme cruelty in the dogma, the sexual intolerance, the need to separate from unbelievers and the concept of hell would on their own prevent the full development of empathy. The negative emotions caused by all the previous things mentioned would also blunt empathy or make one hostile. In a state of aggression, empathy turns inside out, and one wants pain and harm on the target of that aggression. So perhaps the myriad failures of religion can lead to an emotional state that favors evil intent.

186 Targetpractice  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 1:18:01pm

re: #184 SteveMcG

“I guess it’s just too hard, so I won’t even try.”

You wanna view it that way, go for it. Me, I personally gave up on unicorn chasing ages ago. If a Republican “moderate” wants to run third party and act as a spoiler, sure, I’ll support him. If the moderate chooses to run for the GOP and do as Romney did, completely shedding every moderate position of his in order to rally the party in the general, then fuck’em.

187 Mattand  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 1:31:55pm

re: #17 SteveMcG

I’m still registered Republican. It’s MY party and these assholes are crashing it. I’m not leaving. In fact, I urge EVERYBODY to join the Republican Party. The only why to disinfect the party is to get these clowns out in the primary process. Too many low information voters think guys like Chris Christie can straighten out the party. Problem with that is a Republican can’t do anything without the tea party caucus, and there are still too many reactionaries infesting the state legislatures. So we need to take this thing viral. Tell all your friends to register Republican. They can even run in primaries against incumbent wingnuts. As Christine O’Donnell and Sharon Engel showed, a primary is winnable, especially if you can get your friends to register with you. It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

Jesus, step away for a minute and the derp just comes rolling in.

1) Low information voters, huh? WTF would I join a party whose leaders are at best, endorsing shit like Birtherism by ignoring it?

2) WTF would I join a party whose leaders’ idea of negotiating is to bankrupt the country because they didn’t get what they want?

3) Sharon Engel? Do you mean Sharron Angle, of “2nd Amendment remedies” fame?

4) Send the racists back to the Democratic Party. Yeah, good to know Fox News still works on your cable system.

Sheesh.

188 FemNaziBitch  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 1:32:06pm

No mention of science, women or religious intolerance.

Mr. Powell just got knocked down at least three rungs on my ladder of esteem.

189 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 1:45:22pm

re: #188 FemNaziBitch

At least he faced the fact that the Republicans are going to have to change some stances.

Go to any Republican forum and they can’t face that there is anything wrong with far right positions. “Conservatism can not fail, it can only be failed.” He timidly attacked the intransigence that that is the problem. I go to the forums and they seem to define themselves BY their intransigence. Or maybe ‘intransigence’ is too neutral a word, and the real problem is that the feeling behind it is hate, resentment, enmity. Perhaps nothing gets done because the goal is to show enmity toward most of humanity, including the Democrats.

190 FemNaziBitch  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 1:51:24pm

re: #189 stabby

At least he faced the fact that the Republicans are going to have to change some stances.

Go to any Republican forum and they can’t face that there is anything wrong with far right positions. “Conservatism can not fail, it can only be failed.” He timidly attacked the intransigence that that is the problem. I go to the forums and they seem to define themselves BY their intransigence. Or maybe ‘intransigence’ is too neutral a word, and the real problem is that the feeling behind it is hate, resentment, enmity. Perhaps nothing gets done because the goal is to show enmity toward most of humanity, including the Democrats.

I understand your sentiments. As I was first watching the interview I felt similarly. Yet, he left out ME.

He left out the attack on my healthcare. He left out the fact that the GOP is ruled by ancient tribal myths that are at the heart of misogyny.

Almost getting it right isn’t good enough Mr. Powell.

191 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 1:58:31pm

re: #190 FemNaziBitch

Agreed.

Well his job was killing people, not deep insight.

192 FemNaziBitch  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 2:01:33pm

re: #191 stabby

Agreed.

Well his job was killing people, not deep insight.

Actually, I still have respect for Mr. Powell. He does have a depth of insight many in his field do not. His autobiography made me a fan.

I think he is just a product of his generation that cannot get past the “women on a pedestal” concept. And, as you said, being a military man, he is patriarchal to the bone.

193 jamesfirecat  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 3:01:34pm

re: #17 SteveMcG

I’m still registered Republican. It’s MY party and these assholes are crashing it. I’m not leaving. In fact, I urge EVERYBODY to join the Republican Party. The only why to disinfect the party is to get these clowns out in the primary process. Too many low information voters think guys like Chris Christie can straighten out the party. Problem with that is a Republican can’t do anything without the tea party caucus, and there are still too many reactionaries infesting the state legislatures. So we need to take this thing viral. Tell all your friends to register Republican. They can even run in primaries against incumbent wingnuts. As Christine O’Donnell and Sharon Engel showed, a primary is winnable, especially if you can get your friends to register with you. It’s time to send these racists and idiots back where they came from, the Democratic Party.

No thanks pal we jettisoned those losers back in the sixties, they’re your problem now!

194 stabby  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 3:31:31pm

re: #193 jamesfirecat

There may be some hope that the Republican party can jettison the nuts based on this observation:

The tea party is largely funded and supported by oligarchs. Koch bros, Murdoch, evil money guys like the club for growth. If they decide that the tea party is making the party unelectable, they may look for ways to marginalize it.

195 Decider  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 9:25:39pm

The GOP is past the point of no return. Nothing can change their destiny to become irrelevant nationally. Ultimately, Fox News will be seen in history as the cause of what has happened to the GOP.

196 wheat-dogghazi  Sun, Jan 13, 2013 11:14:35pm

re: #121 Gus

Whenever I see the words “Messianic Jew” or “Messianic Rabbi,” my mind almost gets a BSOD. A Jew who worships Jesus as Messiah is to me not a Jew, but that’s my Long Island background speaking, I suppose. I’ve met these kind of people, and some are just a little bit strange. Rabbi Cahn sounds only slightly more extreme.


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More Floral Fireworks
Another montage of macro photos - focusing this time on flower close-ups. Taken using the standard lens on a Nikon 3200 using the a macro auto-setting. My observation for taking these is that a breeze can be quite annoying. :) ...

5 days, 20 hours ago
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 Frank says:

Scientology, how about that? You hold on to the tin cans and then this guy asks you a bunch of questions, and if you pay enough money you get to join the master race. How's that for a religion? -- Concert at the Rockpile, Toronto, May 1969