Pages

Jump to bottom

28 comments

1 Bob Levin  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 6:14:51pm

Well, Rosh Hashanah, really this whole holiday season is one of judgment. There are those who will say that Rosh Hashanah is the day that Gd completed the creation of the universe. There are disputes in the public arena about just how long this took.

That’s not very interesting. What is interesting is the argument in the Talmud regarding exactly when creation was actually completed, Rosh Hashanah or the first of Nissan, around Passover. You’d think this wouldn’t be much of an argument, but as it goes on, surprisingly, Gd finished up around the first of Nissan.

Then why celebrate Rosh Hashanah on the first of Tishrei? I’ll let someone else take that, because I have jury duty tomorrow and I’m not in the best mood.

The other interesting part of Rosh Hashanah is that, although we talk about the creation of the universe, we really never get to talking about the exact nature of that universe. In other words, what’s it like, what are the rules? The Torah is pretty open about this. In a certain way of looking at the universe, the shofar, the apples and honey can only be symbols of some quality or wish. To me, though,symbols are basically empty. It occurred to me that the shofar, for instance, is a commandment, is discovered through intense heart sweat, and therefore could not be merely a symbol.

So I began to rethink of my conception of the universe, molding it like clay, until I began to see the world in such a way where the shofar is high technology. And the more I did this, all of the anomaly laws, called Chukim, began to disappear. In other words, they fit. They made sense. They were no longer anomalies.

I think this can be done with every religion, although I wouldn’t know for certain. However, in the Jewish view of the universe, consciousness is the primary force. And as a force, a force we continually emit (but it’s not a force limited to humans), it has consequences—which appear to us as Karma, as human history, as Jewish history. It’s a force that we haven’t mastered, and consequently, we screw up a lot. A whole lot. There must be a mechanism for us to fix our broken consciousness. And that’s why the sages say that Gd invented Teshuvah, the ability to change and heal, before the world was created.

And so, on these holidays (from Rosh Hashanah to Succot) we try to examine our consciousness—for some it is simply to become aware of our consciousness. And through our examination, we try to fix what is broken. We are using some very sophisticated tools to accomplish this. The more we repair ourselves, the more we repair all of Israel, all of the world. That is essentially the order of the prayers, the only order they can take, beginning with the self and moving outwards.

In western civilization, the only tools we have that affect consciousness (which remains completely undefined), are psychotropic drugs, and recreational drugs. Maybe jazz. I dig jazz. But that’s about it. Small tool belt when we have such a big job to do.

However, the Torah gives us the complete tool belt, and this includes recognizing and using tools from other cultures, such as acupuncture or New Physics. It’s a big job, and therefore, we call these days ‘The Days of Awe’.

2 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 6:21:38pm

If you want an overview and simple explanation of the high holidays, here is a good site to start.

As to what it personally means to me? A whole bunch of work! Especially when the holiday comes out Thursday-Friday-Shabbat.

Ha ha, kidding aside, Rosh Hashanah is the day that G-D judges the world, so we beg G-D to have mercy upon us, His humble (and sometimes arrogant) creation. Now, a day on which your fate hangs in the balance, you would be fearful and upset, but we are commanded to be joyful.

The Judgment begins on Rosh Hashanah and is completed at the end of Yom Kippur.

3 sffilk  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 6:23:11pm

It’s a time of introspection, where we ask for forgiveness from G-D. The ten days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are known as the Ten Days of Penitence. We Jews believe that “on Rosh Hashanah our fate (for the new year) is written, and on Yom Kippur, it is sealed.”

The traditional food would be apples dipped in honey or challah dipped in honey. We say a blessing over it that says, “May it be Thy will, oh L-rd our G-D and G-d of our fathers, that you bless us with a good and sweet year.”

For me, services will last about 4-5 hours each day, with the “highlight” of the service being the shofar service, the blowing of the ram’s horn. It signals the beginning of the holy days and at the end of the Ne’ilah service on Yom Kippur, it is blown as a symbol of the closing of the gates of heaven (IIRC) and the sealing of the Book of Life, in which our fate is written for the new year.

The standard greeting at Rosh Hashanah time is “May you be inscribed for a good year.” At Yom Kippur, the greeting changes to “May you be sealed for a good year.”

4 PhillyPretzel  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 6:26:06pm

It has been a long time for me to recall what most of the symbols mean. I will recommend beliefnet.com as a source. Also I recommend reading Judaism for Everyone by Shmuley Boteach. It has a chapter on Rosh Hashanah. It is a time for reflection and prayer.

5 CuriousLurker  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 6:43:03pm

re: #1 Bob Levin

Ouch—sorry to hear about the jury duty, but thanks for the great explanation. I knew you’d come through. ;)

re: #2 Alouette

As to what it personally means to me? A whole bunch of work!

LOL, I’ll bet it does. Thanks for the serious part and the link.

re: #3 sffilk

Excellent. Thanks for the additional details.

re: #4 PhillyPretzel

Thanks for the recommendations. I’ll definitely do some more reading, I just wanted to get a more personal feeling for it from folks I’m familiar with. It seems more real to me that way, if that makes any sense.

6 PhillyPretzel  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 6:47:37pm

re: #5 CuriousLurker
Yes, it does make sense. You are looking at something through someone else’s views in order to expand your own views.

7 cat-tikvah  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:01:38pm

The short form might be: reflection, repentance, renewal. Starting in the month before Rosh Hashanah (Elul) we are meant to be doing some serious soul-searching, taking stock, honestly, of the past year — where we stood tall, and where we fell short. The Hebrew word that encompasses “sin” is more akin to “missing the mark”. Being human, we are sure to make mistakes, mess up, do wrong things. Our task is to acknowledge them, be accountable — and make things right.

The process of making things right is teshuvah — to turn/return, more commonly translated as “repentance”. Teshuvah goes in two directions —yes, between human beings and God, but also between human beings. “For transgressions between human beings and God, the Day of Atonement atones. For transgressions between one human being and another, the Day of Atonement does not atone until they have made peace with each other.” You can’t “wipe the slate clean” via God. It’s not “what’s in your heart” or “good intentions”. You, personally, have to go to others to seek — and offer — forgiveness.

So along with deep and solemn repentance between a person and God, there also must be personal, face to face, sincere repair of relationships. There are criteria for teshuvah, which can perhaps be summed up thus:

Acknowledge what you did. Accept responsibility. “I did it”
Apologize to the person you wronged. “I’m sorry”
Make sincere concerted efforts to make amends. “How do I make this right?”
Learn and change; don’t do it again.

We are human. We make mistakes. We are accountable. We must make things right.

Others noted the concept of the Book of Life, and how each person’s fate is determined for the coming year between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. I don’t take this literally, but if I act as if my very life hangs in the balance, it takes on an intensity and urgency.

The shofar has been said to be like a spiritual alarm clock, waking sleepers from their slumber, compelling action. The sounds of the shofar include one long note, three short notes, and 9 very short staccato notes. It’s been noted that “each series of shofar blasts begins and ends with a tekiah (whole note) surrounding a shevarim or teru’ah (broken note). This is the theme of Rosh Hashanah. We were whole, became broken, shall be whole again. We were whole, broken, even shattered into fragments, but we shall yet be whole again” (Arthur Green).

It can be an intense but ultimately profoundly spiritually cleansing experience.

8 What, me worry?  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:06:28pm

I always love your curious lurking :) Great picture, btw!

Since you asked for a personal description, I’ll tell you that Rosh Hashanah and all the holidays are filled with wonderful family memories. If you’ll indulge me :)

When I was a kid, the holidays started with synagogue services, of course, and they were always very long. When I got antsy, my father always graciously offered to take me for a walk. The holidays always meant some real one-on-one time with dad which was always super special.

All our holidays were at my aunt’s house. She was an amazing cook and loved to entertain. She cooked for about 30 people and would start months before. She set a beautiful table with odds pieces of china; creamers, pitchers, antique salt & pepper shakers, etc. At each setting was a name tag that was held by a little pewter animal figure. So it was fun to find your name and your little creature. “I’m a chicken tonight!”

My cousin and I used to set the dessert table. Each of my aunts dessert services (plate, cup, saucer) were unique. 1 Wedgwood set, 1 Lennox set, and then there were these pieces she got at the gas station. Before you laugh at that, back in the day of $.30/gallon gas, the gas stations would do free give-aways with a fill-up. For a long while, they gave away china, except that it was made in Japan, which you hardly find anymore without a cost. She must have collected 20 of these sets over the years. Anyhoo, my cousin and I had a blast picking out who would get what and everyone enjoyed looking at everyone else’s dish.

Did I mention my aunt was a teacher? lol

After the feast, there was the Big Walk around the neighborhood together. When we got back, the men would sit around talking politics and the women - who remembers, women stuff. My cousin and I always sat with the men… I know, big surprise! And half the time, I had no clue what they were saying, but it was always about Israel…. I know, big surprise!

I could go on :) Today, most of that family is gone. My aunts and uncles, my older mother’s cousins. The rest of us are spread around the country from CA to MA so I celebrate with friends and I love it. It’s always great, but it will never be the same as it was.

9 What, me worry?  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:10:00pm

re: #1 Bob Levin

That was so beautiful Bob, I’m favorting it. And I think sending it to my mom :)

10 CuriousLurker  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:14:48pm

re: #6 PhillyPretzel

Yes, it does make sense. You are looking at something through someone else’s views in order to expand your own views.

Yes, exactly!

11 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:18:30pm

re: #8 marjoriemoon

I favorited yours!

Family memories are the best. My kids are all grown up and moved away, with families of their own. Two years ago we went to Israel to be with my daughter and her family. This year, not going anywhere, but the good news is that I have a full time job, which I am very grateful for in this economy. I have to plan carefully and I started cooking and baking for this 3-day event last week!

My youngest daughter will be joining us this year.

12 What, me worry?  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:19:01pm

re: #7 cat-tikvah

Love everything you all said, and Cat, the explanation of the shofar was wonderful!

Here’s a vid on blowing the shofar (ram’s horn) at Rosh Hashahah. That’s quite an impressive shofar, I must say.

13 What, me worry?  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:23:04pm

re: #11 Alouette

I favorited yours!

Family memories are the best. My kids are all grown up and moved away, with families of their own. Two years ago we went to Israel to be with my daughter and her family. This year, not going anywhere, but the good news is that I have a full time job, which I am very grateful for in this economy. I have to plan carefully and I started cooking and baking for this 3-day event last week!

My youngest daughter will be joining us this year.

Fantastic! So see? All that hard work of yours will never be for nothing!

I had a Jewish education, but we were never very religious. I’ve only got back to it as I got older and started to focus more on the spiritual aspects, like those discussed. Family was everything which I guess is the heart of most religious experience anyway.

14 Bob Levin  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:27:39pm

re: #9 marjoriemoon

Thanks, you nailed the family aspect perfectly. You did not mention the sneaking off to see the World Series.

Seriously, this atonement period doesn’t end end until Hoshanah Rabbah, after Succos. So stay focused one and all.

15 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:28:45pm

Honey challah recipe for Rosh Hashanah.

I made the same recipe yesterday, but didn’t take any new pictures because the loaves look the same as last year.

Rosh Hashanah honey challah

16 Vicious Babushka  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:30:13pm

re: #14 Bob Levin

Thanks, you nailed the family aspect perfectly. You did not mention the sneaking off to see the World Series.

Seriously, this atonement period doesn’t end end until Hoshanah Rabbah, after Succos. So stay focused one and all.

I remember when the Tigers won the World Series, it was on Sukkos, in 1984. Actually it was during Chol Hamoed because we were listening to the game in the sukkah.

Now the World Series is in November.

17 What, me worry?  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:33:00pm

A wonderful Rosh Hashanah recipe to try from Africa. (Wonder if you could substitute or leave off the lamb/veal… I don’t do veal.)

Black-eyed Peas - A New Years Tradition

Submitted by Diane Tobin, President Be’chol Lashon
Recipe from Claudia Roden’s The Book of Jewish Food

Finding new recipes from around the world is a Tobin family holiday tradition, that celebrates global Jewish diversity. This year’s recipe, Loubia or black-eyed peas from Claudia Roden’s The Book of Jewish Food, is an Egyptian dish symbolizing fertility and good luck for Rosh Hashanah. The “good luck” traditions of eating black-eyed peas for the new year are recorded in the Babylonian Talmud. Originally native to Africa, the black-eyed pea was introduced into the West Indies and from there to the Southern United States. Today, eating black eyed peas is a new years tradition among some Mizrachi, Sephardi, and Israeli Jews, as well as others throughout the Caribbean and the American South. We can learn much about the culture and tradition of diverse Jewish communities around the world through food.

Recipe for Loubia - Rosh Hashanah Egyptian Black-eyed peas

1 onion, chopped
3 tablespoons sunflower oil
2 garlic cloves, minced or crushed in a press
1.5 lb (750 g) lamb or veal, cubed
1 lb (500 g) tomatoes, peeled and chopped
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 lb (500 g) dried black-eyed peas, soaked for 1 hour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
Salt and pepper
1-2 teaspoons sugar

Fry the onion in the oil till golden. Add the garlic, and when aroma rises add the meat. Stir to brown it all over. Add the tomatoes and tomato paste.

Drain the black-eyed peas, and simmer on fresh water for 15 minutes, then drain and add them to the meat. Add cinnamon and allspice and cook for 2 hours, adding salt and pepper to taste and the sugar after about 1 hour.

18 Bob Levin  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:33:30pm

re: #16 Alouette

That’s true. See how Gd works? No more sneaking off to watch Koufax.

19 CuriousLurker  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:37:12pm

re: #7 cat-tikvah

Wonderful explanation, thank you! We have similar requirements similar to teshuvah, but they’re not at any specific time. It’s neat that you have a designated time for reflecting and taking stock.

I love the idea of a spiritual alarm clock. I just went to YouTube find a video of the shofar so I could hear what you were talking about.

re: #8 marjoriemoon

Love the family stories—you took me there, just like I wanted. Thank you for sharing such warm, happy family memories.

I remember the free china with a fill-up! I think those wen away about the same time as S&H Green Stamps and the hand towels you used to get in boxes of detergent.

Today, most of that family is gone. My aunts and uncles, my older mother’s cousins. The rest of us are spread around the country from CA to MA so I celebrate with friends and I love it. It’s always great, but it will never be the same as it was.

Yes, memories. *sigh* I’m glad you enjoy celebrating with your friends though. ;)

20 CuriousLurker  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 7:40:59pm

re: #15 Alouette

re: #17 marjoriemoon

Nom, nom, nom…

21 Flavia  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 8:50:48pm

Gee, found this one kinda late.

(Rather than go over all the laws & general customs, I’ll just throw in my personal 2 cents.)

When I was young, every Jewish holiday was a great excuse to get out school, which I utterly detested :-) I suppose my parents laid a groundwork for me when they went out of their way to make it clear to the teachers that I would be taking off all the high holidays, & not just the first day or so, like the other kids (who bothered to stay home). I never thought about it - until I had my own kids. While our school system actually does let the kids out for some holidays, they only have the first day off for the 2 day holidays! The more things change…

But the holidays - especially Rosh HaShanah - are always a period of reflection - certainly more so since I got out of school! Always another occasion to improve myself. Wish me luck :-)

22 shutdown  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 9:34:27pm

I, too, found this thread a little late in the day - hopefully CL will return to it.

R”H - to start with an interesting bit of biblical trivia - is considered, amongst many other things, as the wedding anniversary date of Adam and Eve. While this may sound cute, but relatively devoid of significance, it is not. The relationship amongst spouses is generally viewed as the most intimate relationship a person can have. The precept of “Love thy neighbour as thyself” is interpreted by some Sages as applying first and foremost to one’s spouse (the Hebrew word “re’echa” should actually be translated as “the one close to you”, not “neighbour”). Which brings us from the world of biblical arcana to the core of the R”H holiday, as seen by Imp.

It is said, and agreed by most scholars, that the relationship between a person and Gd (defined as “bein adam le’makom” - between person and Heaven/Seat of the Divine) cannot be properly cultivated until relationships between people have been fixed (“bein adam le’chavero” - between a person and his friend/partner). In other words, a person cannot engage in proper piety towards Gd if he has not engaged in appropriate behaviour towards his fellow members of society; Gd is not interested in outward displays of religious fervour by people who neglect or abuse others. Since during R”H, all the way through Succot (the Feast of Tabernacles), we attempt to build and improve our relationship with Gd, the clear implication - to me - is that the rest of the year must be spent improving interpersonal relations. We cannot step before Gd, asking to approach the Heavenly Throne to beg forgiveness, if we are neglectful of our relationships with other people.

For me, the R”H is a time of internal dialogue, a sincere attempt to reconnect with the spiritual, and to look at the map to make sure I have not strayed too far from the road.

And brisket. LOTS of brisket.

23 Bob Levin  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 10:46:44pm

re: #22 imp_62

And brisket. LOTS of brisket.

At 98 bucks a pound.

24 Bob Levin  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 10:47:59pm

Jews trending vegetarian—Bloomberg News.

No article, but, I take it everyone has noticed this.

25 eightyfiv  Mon, Sep 26, 2011 11:22:02pm

re: #21 Flavia

Ah, yes.
The high holidays are an annual ritual in which observant Jews argue, cajole, beg, and badger their teachers, employers, or childrens’ teachers (depending on age) over the fact that they will not be present and will not be working on those days, and yes it’s a lot of days, but it’s only once a year, and no, this is not the Jewish day school, but do you really believe Jews should be forced either to violate core tenets of their faith or attend only segregated institutions and very well we *will* go talk to the Dean of Students…

Sorry, I’m just a little bitter. :P
My wife’s getting a lot of grief over it this year. That, and the catch-up work that follows, always put a damper on the holiday spirit.

26 Vicious Babushka  Tue, Sep 27, 2011 4:23:21am

re: #17 marjoriemoon

I hate black-eyed peas, the food and the band. I made it one year, nobody ate it, everybody hated it, in the words of the supervillain Kahane, “Never Again!”

Since Rosh Hashanah always includes a new fruit, it’s getting harder to find “new fruit” that isn’t already available all year round. This year I got a pomegranate, fresh figs, a passion fruit and a “horned melon.” One year I bought an exotic new fruit, and everybody gagged on it. “It smells and tastes like sweaty socks!” I think it was a durian. Star fruit is another fail.

27 CuriousLurker  Tue, Sep 27, 2011 6:21:59am

re: #21 Flavia

You’re only late if the thread closes before you find it. ;)

Heh, I suspect there are more than a few kids for whom the best part of any religious holiday is getting out of school for a few days.

But the holidays - especially Rosh HaShanah - are always a period of reflection - certainly more so since I got out of school! Always another occasion to improve myself. Wish me luck :-)

Good luck!

re: #22 imp_62

I always check my pages.

That’s interesting, the wedding anniversary part.

The rights of and obligations to immediate family, especially one’s spouse, are of utmost importance to us as well—at least they’re supposed to be—and for the same reasons you listed.

We have a hadith that says marriage is half of our deen, or religion/faith. It took me a long time to fully grasp what that meant.

We cannot step before Gd, asking to approach the Heavenly Throne to beg forgiveness, if we are neglectful of our relationships with other people.

QFT

And brisket. LOTS of brisket.

Lots of brisket is always a good thing! LOL

re: #25 eightyfiv

Sorry to hear you & your wife have a hard time with the school thing.

re: #26 Alouette

One year I bought an exotic new fruit, and everybody gagged on it. “It smells and tastes like sweaty socks!” I think it was a durian.

Yikes!!

28 Bob Levin  Tue, Sep 27, 2011 2:47:37pm

re: #26 Alouette

Oh. Yes. The Durian fail. We’ve discovered that there is a good reason we haven’t eaten certain fruits over the course of the year.


This page has been archived.
Comments are closed.

Jump to top

Create a PageThis is the LGF Pages posting bookmarklet. To use it, drag this button to your browser's bookmark bar, and title it 'LGF Pages' (or whatever you like). Then browse to a site you want to post, select some text on the page to use for a quote, click the bookmarklet, and the Pages posting window will appear with the title, text, and any embedded video or audio files already filled in, ready to go.
Or... you can just click this button to open the Pages posting window right away.
Last updated: 2016-01-01 10:29 am PST
LGF User's Guide RSS Feeds Tweet

Help support Little Green Footballs!

Subscribe now for ad-free access!Register and sign in to a free LGF account before subscribing, and your ad-free access will be automatically enabled.

Donate with
PayPal
Square Cash Shop at amazon
as an LGF Associate!
Recent PagesClick to refresh
GINO VANELLI BROTHER to BROTHERRemember complex musical compositions? GINO VANELLI BROTHER TO BROTHER DARYL STUERMER MARK CRANEY Buy songs at ITUNES: music.apple.com
Thanos
4 days, 8 hours ago
Views: 245 • Comments: 0 • Rating: 0
Tweets: 1 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
#Thegreatpoolpondconversion - 190818a lot of work was done. it may not look like muchsince it was 'only' 95 degrees, we managed two solid hours today. first we built a short ramp so we could back up onto the deck. That cart full ...
DangerMan
5 days, 4 hours ago
Views: 302 • Comments: 3 • Rating: 5
Tweets: 0 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
John Coltrane - Blue World (Visualizer)Music video by John Coltrane performing Blue World (Visualizer). © 2019 UMG Recordings, Inc. vevo.ly
Thanos
1 week ago
Views: 352 • Comments: 0 • Rating: 0
Tweets: 1 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
The Revivalists - Oh No (Made in Muscle Shoals) We snuck away to the legendary Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals to record this special live version of "Oh No".Stream the new version: found.ee Directed & Produced by Jay SansoneVideographer - Frank BernalVideographer - Dan Ladue Stream/Order Take Good ...
Thanos
1 week, 2 days ago
Views: 313 • Comments: 0 • Rating: 0
Tweets: 3 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
The Nude Party - Gringo Che (Live on the Current)The Nude Party perform 'Gringo Che' from their self-titled 2018 album live in The Current studio.
Thanos
1 week, 2 days ago
Views: 350 • Comments: 0 • Rating: 0
Tweets: 4 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
Gary Clark Jr. - Pearl Cadillac - Live at Lollapalooza 2019, Saturday August 3, 2019
Thanos
1 week, 3 days ago
Views: 444 • Comments: 0 • Rating: 0
Tweets: 1 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
#Thegreatpoolpondconversion - 190811Yesterday we began some backfilling. Dumping sand between the sandbags we laid last week and the pool wall. Then raking flat, and tamping down. After that we build more sandbag wall, then more sand, etc., till we get to the ...
DangerMan
1 week, 4 days ago
Views: 393 • Comments: 0 • Rating: 3
Tweets: 0 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
The Black Keys - Go [‘Let’s Rock’ Tour Rehearsals] Watch the tour rehearsal video for “Go” now ⚡ Catch the band on the "Let's Rock" Tour this Autumn. Get tickets now at theblackkeys.com 2019 TOUR DATESSep 21 | Las Vegas, NVSep 23 | Denver, CO Sep 24 | ...
Thanos
1 week, 5 days ago
Views: 504 • Comments: 0 • Rating: 0
Tweets: 4 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
THE IMPOSTORS - Don’t Get Mad (1980) Here's a band I sometimes skipped meals to pay the cover for in the early '80's - The Impostors. Johnny Campbell, the drummer, would also sometimes work as Jo Allen and the Shapes drummer when Jo Allen (also a ...
Thanos
1 week, 5 days ago
Views: 401 • Comments: 0 • Rating: 0
Tweets: 5 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0
Elizabeth Warren Introduces Sweeping Gun Control Plan Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren introduced a sweeping gun control plan Saturday with the goal of reducing gun deaths by 80% through executive action and legislation. "You've got to start with a goal. I haven't heard anybody else talk about ...
Thanos
1 week, 6 days ago
Views: 416 • Comments: 1 • Rating: 1
Tweets: 2 • Share to Facebook
Shares: 0
Comments: 0
: 0