little green footballs

Newsweek Reports on the Growing Alliance Between Netanyahu's Likud Party and Europe's Anti-Semitic Far Right

Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 10:39:33 am

Long-time readers of LGF will recognize many of the names of people and organizations called out in this piece by Charles Hawley; these are the very fascists and antisemites who made alliances with American "counter-jihad" groups years ago, leading me to make a clean break with them and their hateful agenda. (Click on any of the tags below this post for more information on this back story.)

For the past few years I've been watching in horror as Israeli political parties like Likud increasingly embrace these awful people: Netanyahu's Unholy Alliance With Europe's 'Anti-Semitic' Far Right.

But one growing faction in Europe is welcoming Benjamin Netanyahu and his re-election with open arms. On the ultra-conservative periphery, among the xenophobic, nativist fringe, right-wing populists are unabashedly rejoicing. For them, Europe is engaged in a battle against encroaching Islam - and the hardliner Netanyahu, they believe, is doing yeoman's work on the front lines. "Benjamin Netanyahu's victory is a good thing for several reasons," Geert Wilders, the vociferous anti-Islam incendiary from the Netherlands, said in an emailed statement. "We share his criticism of Iran . . . and his opposition to a Palestinian state in Judea and Samaria."

"We are very happy," agrees Filip Dewinter, a leading member of Belgian right-wing party Vlaams Belang. "It is a good thing for Israel, but also good for right-wing parties in Europe because he understands that the first danger for Europe is Islamisation." David Lasar, a foreign policy co-ordinator for the Austrian Freedom Party, echoed that sentiment. "For sure, I am very happy," says Lasar, who has worked hard in recent years to develop ties with staunchly conservative parties overseas. "It is a very important step that Netanyahu has won the election."

From the perspective of a European chauvinistic periphery that has increasingly been striving for mainstream legitimacy in the recent past, the enthusiasm is understandable. As groups like the Austrian Freedom Party, France's Front National and the Swedish Democrats have long histories of anti-Semitism, recent years have seen them attempting to refocus their enmity on Islam and Islamists. With that shift has come a recognition that Israeli conservatives, with their rejection of a Palestinian state and hardline approach to Islamism, are their natural allies.