Comment

What the Atlantic Gets Dangerously Wrong About ISIS and Islam

7
CuriousLurker2/18/2015 2:54:26 pm PST

That extremists can cherry pick texts to support their actions does not make their interpretation “legitimate” as one of the numerous quotes from Haykel asserts. Emphasis added:

He regards the claim that the Islamic State has distorted the texts of Islam as preposterous, sustainable only through willful ignorance. “People want to absolve Islam,” he said. “It’s this ‘Islam is a religion of peace’ mantra. As if there is such a thing as ‘Islam’! It’s what Muslims do, and how they interpret their texts.” Those texts are shared by all Sunni Muslims, not just the Islamic State. “And these guys have just as much legitimacy as anyone else.” […]

theatlantic.com

Haykel also says:

But Muslims who call the Islamic State un-Islamic are typically, as the Princeton scholar Bernard Haykel, the leading expert on the group’s theology, told me, “embarrassed and politically correct, with a cotton-candy view of their own religion” that neglects “what their religion has historically and legally required.”

What he’s doing, albeit in a semi-subtle way, is confirming the Gelleresque claims of Taqiyya!!11!. It’s amazing how many non-Muslims claim to have a better understanding of Islam than Muslims themselves.

A Muslim simply believing something doesn’t make it legitimate, no matter how sincere that belief is. Or perhaps the definition of “legitimate” has changed recently? I’ll ask again as I did on the previous page in my #2:

If Daesh is legitimate, then why did close to 200 Muslim leaders and scholars from around the world write an open letter discussing no less that 24 points on which they are entirely off base? Here’s the PDF of the entire letter in English—it’s also available in 9 other languages, including Arabic, at the website’s main page—there are 126 signatures at the end of it & 49 more here. […]

People, listen—Wood even quoted Anjem-freaking-asshgole-Choudary several times, including his take on who qualifies a Muslim, FFS. Does that not set off ANY effing alarms for anyone? Why are they even asking him? He’s not a scholar or an authority on Islamic jurisprudence. Hell, he’s not even representative of a significant portion of British Muslims, he’s just a bigoted extremist asshole who’s full of himself. But, yeah, lets quote him as if he’s some kind of “legitimate” authority on mainstream Islam:

Non-muslims cannot tell Muslims how to practice their religion properly. But Muslims have long since begun this debate within their own ranks. “You have to have standards,” Anjem Choudary told me. “Somebody could claim to be a Muslim, but if he believes in homosexuality or drinking alcohol, then he is not a Muslim. There is no such thing as a nonpracticing vegetarian.” […]

theatlantic.com

It’s really creepy to see how quickly people’s critical thinking skills falter when it comes to Islam. That’s something I’m now convinced groups like Daesh are counting on.