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1 No Country For Old Haters  Apr 7, 2014 10:12:26pm
Where I once saw a world of black and white (wrong and right | evil and good), I now see a world of colour—millions and millions of colours!

Sounds like a drug experience, or a psychotic break.

Becoming a moral Nihilist has had a far more profound effect on my thinking than being an Atheist ever did. I consider Atheism now nothing more than the intellectual equivalent of teenage rebellion

That was his personal experience. Being Atheist is simply understanding that gods are imaginary. Rejecting religion was not a rebelious act for many of us. We just happened to notice that there’s no evidence for the existence of the supernatural, and religion naturally falls away at that point. If something created us, it would be advanced aliens, not a booga booga mystical being, because mystical beings are imaginary. (No we weren’t created by aliens)

I’ve just given up the need to be good or bad or classify others as such.
What good is it to forgo belief in a being that prescribes what is good or bad, desirable or undesirable if one retains much of that conviction, that need to see the world in moral absolutes. I don’t really care if you ascribe human philanthropy, charity, and mercy to the fact that we are a primate species whose individual success, wellbeing, and happiness mostly depend on the success, wellbeing, and happiness of the other members in our tribe, if you use morality, you are using an outdated system that is the core of all religion.

Morality has nothing to do with religion, though it seems that way from the perspective of someone raised in a religion that claimed to define morality.
Those of us without religion define what’s morally right for ourselves. To me, to be good is to strive to maximise the happiness and health of everyone around you.
As he states, “we are a primate species whose individual success, wellbeing, and happiness mostly depend on the success, wellbeing, and happiness of the other members in our tribe.” How can this be anything but good? The alternative, being greedy and selfish to the detriment of the tribe is evil. What’s that got do to with gods? Nothing.

No longer believing in a supernatural being as the author of morality does not make you any more rational if you insist on following some moral code, even if it is one you self-fabricated in spite or from experience or inherited from evolution.

Of course it does. A moral code based on reason rather than superstitions is what reality-based folks do.

Atheists, in my opinion, should cease this infatuation with morality and trying to prove that their rational or evolutionary morality is somehow superior to the versions peddled by the various religions.

Atheists don’t have an infatuation with morality. They just understand that gods don’t exist. This isn’t the Marvel universe.

Moral Nihilism would be unimaginable for people whose lives revolve around feeling morally superior to others. We see this amongst the religious, the paupers, and the peasants, who all shun those who are more successful at life, labelling them ‘morally inferior’ and ‘destined for eternal punishment.’

What’s he on about? I have never met these peasents of which he speaks. I think he attended a really weird church as a child.

The common man constantly invokes his ‘moral refinement’ over those he envies or hates, but how much more moral (if at all) is the man in the street—really?

Not at all. You get good and bad people at all levels of society.

I dare say, the more stunted the intellect and devoid the mind of instruction, the greater aptitude for bias, prejudice, and thoughtless violence such a mind has.

Of course, but the “man in the street” doesn’t generally have this stunted intellect he epeaks of. There are a lot of crazies out there, but most people are pretty good.

We always see the common man’s moral repugnance at the failures of those he usually holds in high esteem. The Oscar Pistorius trial has demonstrated, again, how judgemental the common man is by way of his ‘moral code’ and how addicted he is to proclaiming judgement before so much as the trial concludes.

Reading the available information, and coming to a conclusion is not an addiction to proclaiming judgement.

After all, what is the difference between the peasants of present day and the Wahhabi muslim extremists in the middle east who blow themselves up for what they believe? Absolutely nothing … and here’s why.
The common peasant (you either subscribe to this class or you don’t, but don’t accuse me of putting you there if you take offence) feels as passionate about his stunted, uneducated opinion as a muslim extremists feels about his precious religion. Both of those have but one thing (extracted from thin air) on which they base all of their self-worth, and from whence all of their judgements about everyone else flows.
Both will yell at the top of their lungs and threaten jihad against anyone that tries to point out the flaws in their opinions/beliefs. And let’s face it, they did not elect their opinions/beliefs from a shelf filled with a multitude of ideologies on offer, neatly packed together for reasonable comparison. Rather, they were indoctrinated from birth or never taught any better an now simply believer 100% in the only thing they know: what they were told by people who think exactly the way they do.

I get the feeling that by “Peasant” he means his extremely religions parents. The difference would be the blowing themselves up part.

As a moral Nihilist, I no longer share any of the abovementioned ambitions with the rest of my species, and I hate the fact that I ever did. But, hey, some of us actually make progress;

Going nuts isn’t progress. What an arrogant douche.

2 No Country For Old Haters  Apr 7, 2014 10:23:09pm
No matter where you demarcate in regards to faith, this ‘user generated’ (Read: non-professional opinion) essay on atheism is worth reading:

As a peek into the mind of someone who got seriously fucked up by religion yes; As an essay on atheism, no.

3 palmerskiss  Apr 8, 2014 2:25:34am

re: #2 No Country For Old Haters

As a peek into the mind of someone who got seriously fucked up by religion yes; As an essay on atheism, no.

maybe - but you also may be missing his point… i, am not a nihilist, but i do not have to agree with him to appreciate his thoughtful perspective.

thanks for reading.

4 Death Panel Truck  Apr 8, 2014 8:29:18am
What an arrogant douche.

That’s my take. An arrogant, pretentious douche.

5 No Country For Old Haters  Apr 8, 2014 9:15:58am

re: #3 palmerskiss

maybe - but you also may be missing his point… i, am not a nihilist, but i do not have to agree with him to appreciate his thoughtful perspective.

thanks for reading.

The thing is, it’s not a thoughtful perspective. It’s a very confused person who starts with a faulty premise, so winds up with wacky conclusions. I didn’t miss the point, I read his screed from a larger perspective, so can see right through his faulty reasoning.

6 palmerskiss  Apr 8, 2014 11:14:47am

re: #5 No Country For Old Haters

The thing is, it’s not a thoughtful perspective. It’s a very confused person who starts with a faulty premise, so winds up with wacky conclusions. I didn’t miss the point, I read his screed from a larger perspective, so can see right through his faulty reasoning.

try reading it again - this time with a touch of sarcasm… it is not meant to be serious.. it is meant to ironic, sarcastic, and it is meant to make you feel uncomfortable.

now - are you suggesting perhaps that the man is not an atheist because he opens his article claiming not to be one?

i’m a bit puzzled why you see this article as serious as opposed to sarcastic

7 No Country For Old Haters  Apr 8, 2014 11:20:54am

I’m puzzled as to why you read it as sarcasm, rather that poorly thought out, internally - inconsistent pseudo-philosophy. There’s a difference between sarcasm and nonsense.

8 palmerskiss  Apr 8, 2014 11:30:56am

re: #7 No Country For Old Haters

I’m puzzled as to why you read it as sarcasm, rather that poorly thought out, internally - inconsistent pseudo-philosophy. There’s a difference between sarcasm and nonsense.

because he sets up immediately, logical fallacies and simplistic conclusions, and sets it up to offend and does so with a snide sarcastic smile.

just like getting you to claim it is not an article about atheism - suggests he proved his point - outline a morality for people, then breach this symbolic yet not immoral basis of the morality and show just how uncomfortable it makes people.

We always see the common man’s moral repugnance at the failures of those he usually holds in high esteem. The Oscar Pistorius trial has demonstrated, again, how judgemental the common man is by way of his ‘moral code’ and how addicted he is to proclaiming judgement before so much as the trial concludes.

he even told you that is what he was doing - he was showing two things - one - morals are subjective and do not need a god construct for one to have a moral construct… and two - that atheists are scared of this fact - that morality is exactly where their weak underbelly is, and that it is adhering to too strict a moral code, not the absence of morals that makes atheists weak in this manner.

he starts out by claiming he is not an atheist - but obviously that is misdirection - the man lacks any faith - therefore he is undeniably an atheist - he knows it - you know it - i know it.

personally whether you agree or not, i like ideas that take us out of our comfort zone, and i post them a lot - for instance anything i have posted on peter singer, who also comes up against these uncomfortable ethic postulations, and is undoubtedly controversial - while still highlighting important contradictions in our nature.

9 palmerskiss  Apr 8, 2014 11:36:00am

re: #7 No Country For Old Haters

I’m puzzled as to why you read it as sarcasm, rather that poorly thought out, internally - inconsistent pseudo-philosophy. There’s a difference between sarcasm and nonsense.

anyways - thanks for reading it and thanks for debating it - :)

10 palmerskiss  Apr 8, 2014 11:41:00am

re: #7 No Country For Old Haters

btw, i just tweeted the author to see if i can get him to come and add some thoughts to our points on the article - he may or may not i dont know - but worth a try.


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