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1 HappyWarrior  Mon, May 21, 2012 1:06:20pm

Terrible.My thoughts go out to his family.

2 Charles Johnson  Mon, May 21, 2012 1:52:45pm

That's a heartbreaking story.

3 Decatur Deb  Mon, May 21, 2012 2:40:41pm

There are blogs that will call this a 'win'.

4 dragonfire1981  Mon, May 21, 2012 3:48:12pm

Here's more info on the Matricula Consular:

[Link: en.wikipedia.org...]

Essentially, it's just an ID card that identifies a Mexican national who is currently residing (illegally or otherwise) in a foreign country. I've seen a few myself since moving to the south.

I find myself a bit conflicted on this:

I can see the argument that this man deserved to stay with and support his family but then again, here was here illegally and when you break the law, there are consequences.

I guess I find myself wondering what should have been done for this man. I don't think it's fair to say "Well you have several U.S. born children, so what the heck, we'll let you stay here."

There are many more men like Alfonso Martinez out there. We need a realistic strategy to deal with this problem.

As an immigrant myself I'm a huge supporter of immigration reform.

5 wrenchwench  Mon, May 21, 2012 5:00:02pm

re: #4 dragonfire1981

Here's more info on the Matricula Consular:

[Link: en.wikipedia.org...]

Essentially, it's just an ID card that identifies a Mexican national who is currently residing (illegally or otherwise) in a foreign country. I've seen a few myself since moving to the south.

I find myself a bit conflicted on this:

I can see the argument that this man deserved to stay with and support his family but then again, here was here illegally and when you break the law, there are consequences.

I guess I find myself wondering what should have been done for this man. I don't think it's fair to say "Well you have several U.S. born children, so what the heck, we'll let you stay here."

There are many more men like Alfonso Martinez out there. We need a realistic strategy to deal with this problem.

As an immigrant myself I'm a huge supporter of immigration reform.

What was done is that the rules for enforcing deportations were changed. Those new rules seem to have been violated in this case. They were put in place to avoid this kind of result. Also, the Border Patrol needs to be more responsible about the consequences of making the border difficult to cross in areas where it isn't lethal to try. They need to patrol the areas that immigrants are driven to try to cross.

At least 249 people believed to be illegal immigrants died in 2010 in southern Arizona, according to data compiled by the Arizona Daily Star from medical examiners and other official sources.

6 Sionainn  Mon, May 21, 2012 5:00:17pm

re: #4 dragonfire1981

Here's more info on the Matricula Consular:

[Link: en.wikipedia.org...]

Essentially, it's just an ID card that identifies a Mexican national who is currently residing (illegally or otherwise) in a foreign country. I've seen a few myself since moving to the south.

I find myself a bit conflicted on this:

I can see the argument that this man deserved to stay with and support his family but then again, here was here illegally and when you break the law, there are consequences.

I guess I find myself wondering what should have been done for this man. I don't think it's fair to say "Well you have several U.S. born children, so what the heck, we'll let you stay here."

There are many more men like Alfonso Martinez out there. We need a realistic strategy to deal with this problem.

As an immigrant myself I'm a huge supporter of immigration reform.

I don't have a problem with being disturbed about this story. It's a misdemeanor crime and we don't give the death penalty for misdemeanors.

7 Dark_Falcon  Mon, May 21, 2012 5:20:59pm

re: #6 Sionainn

I don't have a problem with being disturbed about this story. It's a misdemeanor crime and we don't give the death penalty for misdemeanors.

He wasn't executed, though. He made the decision on his own to try to cross the desert, and that decision ended up killing him. I am saddened that he died and that his children lost their father and his wife her husband. But there was no effort from the US government to kill him, we simply did not want him in the US. But it remains true that a good man died, and that is never a good thing.

8 dragonfire1981  Mon, May 21, 2012 5:30:18pm

re: #6 Sionainn

I don't have a problem with being disturbed about this story. It's a misdemeanor crime and we don't give the death penalty for misdemeanors.

That Arizona desert is a death trap. Interestingly, the main reason it's become such a hot spot for illegal immigrant crossings is because of increased enforcement at the less treacherous crossing points.

Your stat says at least 249 people were killed. That's only the bodies they were able to FIND and record. The actual number is likely much higher. The heat and the elements are rough out there, it's a graveyard of the unknown migrants.

I agree with you about the Border Patrol, but the fact is they have limited resources and manpower with which to police hundreds and hundreds of miles of border.

I see where you're coming from on the death penalty thing. But he wasn't sentenced to death, he was deported. It was his choice to attempt to cross illegally again.

Believe me, I TOTALLY understand and sympathize with why he made that decision, but he wasn't forced to go back. I'm not saying I agree with how he was treated, I'm merely saying I feel considering this a "Death penalty" of sorts is a bit of a stretch.

9 Sionainn  Mon, May 21, 2012 5:42:44pm

re: #8 dragonfire1981

That Arizona desert is a death trap. Interestingly, the main reason it's become such a hot spot for illegal immigrant crossings is because of increased enforcement at the less treacherous crossing points.

Your stat says at least 249 people were killed. That's only the bodies they were able to FIND and record. The actual number is likely much higher. The heat and the elements are rough out there, it's a graveyard of the unknown migrants.

I agree with you about the Border Patrol, but the fact is they have limited resources and manpower with which to police hundreds and hundreds of miles of border.

I see where you're coming from on the death penalty thing. But he wasn't sentenced to death, he was deported. It was his choice to attempt to cross illegally again.

Believe me, I TOTALLY understand and sympathize with why he made that decision, but he wasn't forced to go back. I'm not saying I agree with how he was treated, I'm merely saying I feel considering this a "Death penalty" of sorts is a bit of a stretch.

I don't think it's a stretch at all. The man lived in the U.S. for 20 years and has American citizen children. Deportation is too harsh of a consequence when the U.S. has allowed someone to stay for so long and establish a home and family here.

There needs to be a serious effort at immigration reform.

10 dragonfire1981  Mon, May 21, 2012 5:49:33pm

re: #9 Sionainn

I don't think it's a stretch at all. The man lived in the U.S. for 20 years and has American citizen children. Deportation is too harsh of a consequence when the U.S. has allowed someone to stay for so long and establish a home and family here.

There needs to be a serious effort at immigration reform.

Having nearly completed the legal immigration process myself, I could not agree more.

I also agree this case was seriously mishandled.

11 Sheila Broflovski  Tue, May 22, 2012 4:48:58am

re: #10 dragonfire1981

Having nearly completed the legal immigration process myself, I could not agree more.

I also agree this case was seriously mishandled.

How many times has it happened that a deported Canadian has been found frozen to death attempting to cross from Saskatchewan to Montana in a blinding snowstorm?

12 Sophia77  Tue, May 22, 2012 10:01:24am

This is crazy. I wouldn't have been born if the US hadn't welcomed struggling immigrants, who then gave their lives and labor, genius and creativity to this country.

The US is becoming unrecognizable to me.


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